News | Ultrasound Imaging | September 28, 2018

Clarius Reveals Wireless Cart-Based Ultrasound System at ACEP 2018

Mobile cart gives users the flexibility of wireless ultrasound in more traditional settings

Clarius Reveals Wireless Cart-Based Ultrasound System at ACEP 2018

September 28, 2018 — Clarius Mobile Health is introducing the Clarius Cart at the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) 2018 Scientific Assembly, Oct. 1-4 in San Diego. The Clarius Cart is an ultrasound accessory to complement the company’s lineup of wireless ultrasound scanners for use in more traditional settings. It is a mobile cart with a lockable cabinet to hold scanners, a working space for procedures, and a charging dock for scanner batteries and smart devices. It is designed for hospital and clinical environments to give clinicians the flexibility of personal ultrasound with the utility of traditional cart-based systems, without any cables.

The Clarius Cart can store up to seven Clarius scanners in a locked cabinet, keeping them safe from theft in a busy hospital. Each scanner can be used simultaneously, on different smart devices as required. The Clarius Cart can be transported easily throughout the hospital to serve clinicians where they need it, including at the patient bedside, without having to worry about access to a power outlet.

Clarius ultrasound scanners use 192 elements and four parallel beamformers, and support B-Mode, color doppler, pulsed-wave doppler and more.

For more information: www.clarius.com

Related Content

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Mobile C-Arms | July 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Moblie C-arms have seen several advances over the past de
Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S. launch of the SuperSonic MACH 40 ultrasound system, expanding the company’s suite of ultrasound technologies with its first premium, cart-based system.
News | Breast Imaging | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S.
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac
A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosai

Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosaic pattern with a bronchocentric distribution to the GGO (white arrow, d) involving both central and peripheral lung parenchyma with pleural effusions (black small arrow, d). image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 — In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association wit