News | Ultrasound Imaging | August 03, 2017

Carestream Shows Touch Prime Systems at Society for Vascular Ultrasound Conference

Systems offer more accurate visualization and measurement of velocity while displaying blood flow in multiple directions

Carestream Shows Touch Prime Systems at Society for Vascular Ultrasound Conference

August 3, 2017 — Carestream will showcase its Carestream Touch Prime and Touch Prime XE Ultrasound Systems at the Society for Vascular Ultrasound conference that begins on Aug. 3. These systems are currently available in the United States and Canada.

Carestream’s Smart Flow imaging technology eliminates the transducer angle limitations of ordinary Doppler ultrasound, and its proprietary Smart Flow method can visualize and measure velocity even when blood flow is perpendicular to the acoustic beam. The resulting measurements are angle independent, and therefore less prone to measurement error. These ultrasound systems also visualize blood flow in multiple directions including axial and transverse, which provides more comprehensive information about hemodynamics to assist with diagnostic decisions.

Color coding and arrows automatically display information from Smart Flow technology on the Touch Prime Ultrasound platform. The length of the arrow, in addition to the color, indicates the magnitude of blood flow. The orientation of the arrow indicates flow direction. Ordinary color and spectral Doppler ultrasound only measure velocity of flow components toward or away from a transducer.

Carestream’s advanced SynTek Architecture simultaneously provides enhanced spatial detail with increased frame rates for improved visualization of moving structures, while optimizing image formation to reduce noise and artifacts. Imaging and Doppler improvements allow for more consistent visualization of subtle tissue contrast differences and can increase the ability to see small structures. These systems also deliver uniform lateral resolution over the entire depth and deeper penetration for imaging of the abdomen and other areas.

The company offers specialized transducers for vascular imaging as well as radiology, OB/GYN and musculoskeletal imaging. A direct transducer interface to the ultrasound processing board delivers lower noise and higher image quality, and four transducers can be connected simultaneously to any of the system’s four ports.

The Touch Prime XE is capable of frame rates in excess of 100Hz while maintaining enhanced imaging detail, and includes optional features such as a DICOM package, barcode and radiofrequency identification (RFID) badge readers. Wireless connectivity provides rapid image transfers to picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), radiology information systems (RIS) and other systems. An integrated gel warmer delivers added convenience and patient comfort.

A sealed, all-touch control panel combines the speed and flexibility of a soft user interface with the tactile feedback of traditional keys. Etched marking for primary controls equips the user to easily locate frequently used functions without looking away from the image display monitor. 

For more information: www.carestream.com

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