News | Advanced Visualization | May 08, 2019

Carestream Releases ImageView Software for DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System

New software offers advanced features, enhanced workflow and improved security

New software offers advanced features, enhanced workflow and improved security

May 8, 2019 — Carestream introduced its ImageView Software Platform Windows 10 operating system to deliver enhanced security. ImageView software was first introduced with the Carestream OnSight 3D Extremity Imaging System and will be further expanded across Carestream’s entire portfolio, including rooms, retrofits and additional mobile imaging X-ray systems in the future.

“ImageView software delivers an intuitive interface and consolidated screen views to boost productivity as well as new capabilities that can improve both workflow and security,” said Jill Hamman, Carestream’s Worldwide Marketing Manager for Global X-ray Solutions. “This software uses Eclipse, our advanced image processing engine, to deliver exceptional image quality and enhanced diagnostic confidence, while providing a foundation for new applications in the future.”

The software platform supports image processing and workflow capabilities including: 

  • Enhanced Visualization Processing Plus software that delivers multi-band frequency processing to provide better noise control, sharpness, contrast and density while minimizing artifacts;
  • Tube and Line Visualization that uses a companion image created from the original exposure with optimized processing for clearer, easier visualization of PICC lines and tubes to help increase confidence that tubes and lines are placed correctly;
  • Pneumothorax Visualization that uses a companion image created from the original exposure to accentuate the appearance of free air in the chest cavity;
  • Bone Suppression software that uses a companion image created from the original exposure to reduce the appearance of bone and enable better visualization of soft tissue;
  • Pediatric Image Optimization and Enhancement software that acquires default acquisition techniques and image processing parameters optimized specifically for each patient's body size, from the smallest neonatal patient to the largest adolescent;
  • SmartGrid software that provides image quality comparable to images acquired with an anti-scatter grid and offers reduced patient dose for bedside chest imaging; and
  • Access to RIS and PACS platforms that streamlines exam completion for increased productivity.

ImageView software also provides the ability to manage an imaging department’s productivity and quality. The Administrative Analysis and Reporting option can help improve performance with a digital dashboard that allows users to track average exposure rates by technologist, rejected images with reasons and other statistics including detector drops. The Total Quality Tool package provides objective quality control image tests and collection of detector performance data.

For more information: www.carestream.com

 

Related content:

Carestream’s New Metal-Artifact Reduction Software Improves Anatomy Visibility

Dose Considerations for OnSight 3D Extremity System

 

 

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