News | Artificial Intelligence | February 01, 2021

Canon Medical’s AI-Based Image Reconstruction Technology Now Available for Wider Range

Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) Deep Learning Reconstruction (DLR) technology expands to wider range of clinical applications for the Vantage Orian 1.5T MR system

Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) Deep Learning Reconstruction (DLR) technology expands to wider range of clinical applications for the Vantage Orian 1.5T MR system

February 1, 2021 — Canon Medical is bringing the power of accessible artificial intelligence (AI) for improved image quality to more patients with expanded clinical indications for 1.5T MR. Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) Deep Learning Reconstruction (DLR) can now be used for 96 percent of all procedures using the Vantage Orian 1.5T MR system, expanding from previously FDA-cleared brain and knee indications to a vastly larger number of clinical indications, from prostate to shoulders, including all joints, cardiac, pelvis, abdomen and spine.

AiCE was trained using vast amounts of high-quality image data, and features a deep learning neural network that can reduce noise and boost signal to quickly deliver sharp, clear and distinct images, allowing clinicians to boost image quality, performance, productivity and throughput on a whole new scale.

“As we continue to expand the availability of AiCE, Canon Medical is ensuring that the maximum number of patients can benefit from the advanced images, expanded clinical capabilities and seamless integration that this advanced AI technology provides,” said Jonathan Furuyama, managing director, MR Business Unit, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. “In today’s environment, making images easy to read and acquire is more important than ever, and this is the latest demonstration of our commitment to offering accessible AI that clinicians can use to make the greatest impact on patient care.”

For more information: www.us.medical.canon

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