Technology | June 09, 2009

Canon Introduces High-Res LCOS Projectors for Medical Education

REALiS WUX10 Mark II D

REALiS SX80 Mark II D

June 10, 2009 – Canon U.S.A., Inc. rolled out two new high-resolution REALiS Multimedia Projectors, the REALiS WUX10 Mark II D and REALiS SX80 Mark II D, which will be on display at InfoComm, June 17-19, in Orlando, Fla. at Canon’s booth 5249.

These products feature a DICOM simulation mode for compliance with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Part 14 standardized display function for display of grayscale images. This new mode will provide medical educators with greater flexibility when training and conducting lectures and conferences where a large display is needed. The two projectors are not cleared or approved for medical diagnosis and should not be used for these purposes.

The addition of the DICOM simulation mode on both the Canon REALiS WUX10 Mark II D and REALiS SX80 Mark II D Multimedia Projectors will allow users in the medical education industry to have high-resolution images with detail and clarity. Both multimedia projectors will feature the LCOS technology found on all REALiS models to provide medical educators with the ability to display film-like X-rays to large audiences in lecture halls, while also displaying ultra-smooth, lattice-free images. 

Both new multimedia projectors will allow the user to calibrate directly on the projector rather than having to purchase additional equipment. Canon’s DICOM Simulation mode offers 21 different levels of grayscale gradation for greater flexibility when calibrating in a classroom, conference room or any other venue where a large display is required and the ambient light can vary. 

The Canon REALiS WUX10 Mark II D Multimedia Projector will feature a native WUXGA resolution (1,920 x 1,200) with a 2.30-megapixel display, while the REALiS SX80 Mark II D Multimedia Projector will have a native SXGA+ resolution (1,400 x 1,050) with a 1.47-megapixel display. With the additions of these projectors, Canon has further enhanced its total medical education solution from input (digital X-ray image acquisition) to output (projection).

The new REALiS WUX10 Mark II D Multimedia Projector and REALiS SX80 Mark II D Multimedia Projector are scheduled to be available in October. Both projectors are backed by Canon USA’s three-year limited warranty and its exclusive Projector Protection Program (“Triple P”). Triple P is a free service program that provides a loaner projector of equal or greater value in the event that a qualifying unit is in need of repair. Triple P is available on all Canon projector models during the Three-Year Canon USA Limited Warranty period.

For more information: www.usa.canon.com/projectors

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