News | November 12, 2014

Breast Imaging Among Highlights at ACR 2015

Breast density notification, advances in technology and shifting reimbursement are among hot topics to be covered in clinical education courses at ACR 2015

American College of Radiology 2015, tomosynthesis, BI-RADS Lexicon. mammograms

Nov. 12, 2014 — Breast density notification, advances in technology and shifting reimbursement are among hot topics to be covered in clinical education courses at ACR 2015 – the first all-member, all-radiology meeting of the American College of Radiology (ACR), May 17–21, 2015, at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, DC.

“The program is designed to maximize the educational experience by offering a unique, blended learning approach,” said Cheri Canon, M.D., chair of the American College of Radiology 2015 Program Committee. “The clinical education courses in breast imaging offer content that integrates with clinical research, quality and safety, advocacy, economics, and health policy to help prepare attendees for an increasingly complicated medical landscape.” 

ACR 2015 breast imaging education highlights include:

  • New Technology: Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Proper Reporting — The New BI-RADS Lexicon
  • Breast Imaging Economics, Breast Cancer Epidemiology and the Role of Preoperative Breast MRI
  • Mammographic Screening: Challenges and Answers

In addition, Edward Sickles, M.D., FACR, will present “Mammography Case Review Live,” a limited-seating session in which attendees will use the online Mammography Case Review program to review images in real time and get valuable feedback about the evaluation and interpretation of a variety of breast-related diseases.

“From updates on BI-RADS®, to the value of mammography, there will be something for everyone who has an interest in breast imaging, is looking to improve their clinical skills, and wants to better understand how regulatory and legislative changes may affect their practice,” said Murray Rebner, M.D., American College of Radiology member and president of the Society of Breast Imaging.

Attendees can earn continuing medical education (CME) and self-assessment module (SAM) credits for maintenance of certification.

For more information: acr.org/acr2015

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