Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Blog | Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director | RSNA | November 05, 2018

A Look at Tomorrow’s Radiology Today

RSNA Chicago, IL

Tomorrow’s Radiology Today. This is the theme for the Radiological Society of North America’s (RSNA) 104th meeting and scientific assembly, and this year invites attendees to experience the hands-on, cutting-edge technology of artificial intelligence (AI), 3-D printing and virtual reality. The meeting will take place at Chicago’s McCormick Place Nov. 25-30, 2018.

During a video interview with RSNA President Vijay Rao, M.D., she said that artificial intelligence is by far the most impactful new technology in radiology and it will be one of the leading topics at the 2018 RSNA annual meeting. You can watch the video interview, “RSNA President Says Artificial Intelligence is Hottest Tech Advancement in Radiology,” at https://bit.ly/2EOGKD8. And, going with the theme, many sessions will focus on this important topic. You can browse the complete education schedule for the conference at https://meeting.rsna.org/program/.

This year, attendees can discover special courses, events and features to enhance the meeting experience. At the RSNA/ESR Sports Imaging Symposium, upper extremity sports will be discussed, including Shoulder Injuries in the Throwing Athlete, Soft Tissue Wrist Injury in the Athlete, and an interactive case discussion. The special interest session on Imaging Cognition 2018: Addiction, will discuss Addiction in America, PET as a Tool in Investigating Addiction, fMRI in Addiction, MRS in Craving with a Focus on Alcoholism and a panel discussion. And, Deep Learning in Radiology: How Do We Do It? will discuss how deep learning is being applied in the radiology practice.

Be sure to visit the ITN team in the South Hall, booth 3112. We will be showcasing our recent editorial videos in the booth, as well as the October and November/December issues of ITN and much more. Our editorial team invites you to stop by the booth and chat with us about the new technologies and procedures that you are experiencing at RSNA. We’d also like to hear more about your interests, goals and concerns as we head into a new year. As a reader-driven publication, it is our ultimate goal to provide you with the information you need to remain competitive and informed in the industry ... we want your feedback.

 

Augmented Content

This issue rounds out our year of continuous enhanced coverage of the industry through Blippar content. It’s an interactive and innovative way for you to view expanded content in several of our features in each issue. This issue, our augmented print campaign begins on this page, where you can learn more from RSNA President Vijay Rao, M.D., on how artificial intelligence plays a key role at this year’s conference. On page 16, learn more about patient engagement through the video “Achieving Meaningful Patient Engagement” (https://bit.ly/2Rb7jDQ). And on page 32, you will find additional information on hybrid imaging by watching the video “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology” (https://bit.ly/2PURH7q).

 

See You In Chicago

The entire ITN team is looking forward to taking a look at future technologies … and delving into what lies beyond in imaging. We will see you in Chicago!

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