News | Virtual and Augmented Reality | November 27, 2019

Augmented Reality for Radiology and Cardiology Training Demonstrated at RSNA 2019

 CAE Healthcare will showcase its mixed reality training solutions for practicing physicians and medical imaging companies for the first time at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. With technology platforms that integrate modeled human physiology into immersive, augmented reality environments, CAE Healthcare partners with vendors to deliver risk-free training solutions that meet the needs of physicians and equipment providers. #RSNA19 #RSNA2019

November 27, 2019 — CAE Healthcare will showcase its mixed reality training solutions for practicing physicians and medical imaging companies for the first time at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. With technology platforms that integrate modeled human physiology into immersive, augmented reality environments, CAE Healthcare partners with vendors to deliver risk-free training solutions that meet the needs of physicians and equipment providers.

The hands-on exhibit will be dedicated to simulation-based training platforms for cardiology, radiology and ultrasound-guided procedures, including some of CAE’s newest innovations for medical device companies. CAE will display a custom training solution for Baylis Medical’s suite of transseptal solutions including the NRG, VersaCross, and SupraCross platforms that will allow physicians to practice accessing the left heart before performing transseptal puncture procedures on patients virtually. Attendees will be able to interact with new augmented reality applications for Microsoft HoloLens.

“We are excited to showcase our custom training capabilities at RSNA for the first time,” said Rekha Ranganathan, president of CAE Healthcare. “Given our depth of experience providing simulation-based education products and services to make healthcare safer, we can now offer leading-edge clinical training solutions that cover diagnostics and enable better decision-making to guide interventions and imaging.”

Visitors will be able to offer feedback on a prototype CAE Blue Phantom training model for liver and renal biopsy with multiple imaging modalities, including X-ray, fluoroscopy, MRI and ultrasound. Blue Phantom ultrasound models mimic human tissue for scans and guided procedures, and they can be used with real imaging equipment for learning.

CAE will deliver a showcase presentation titled “Enhancing Training Experience with Microsoft HoloLens” in the North Exhibit Hall 3D + AV Theater on Dec. 3 at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Attendees who would like to learn how CAE Healthcare collaborates with hospitals, medical device and pharmaceutical companies to develop Microsoft HoloLens clinical learning applications are welcome to attend.

The CAE Vimedix 3.0 ultrasound simulator, with more than 200 pathologies for echocardiography and emergency medicine, will also be on display. For more information about CAE Healthcare at RSNA, visit https://www.cae.com/news-events/events/rsna-2019.

For more information: cae.com/healthcare

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