News | Radiology Business | February 22, 2017

ASRT Launches Radiography SEAL Online Tool for Certification Test Prep

Online tool provides 100-question practice exams for 15 radiography student assessments

ASRT, Radiography SEAL, online tool, certification test prep, practice exams

February 22, 2017 — The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) has launched Radiography SEAL: The Radiography Student Exam Assessment Library. Radiography SEAL is an online review tool created to help prepare students for a radiography certification exam.

The ASRT‘s new exam prep tool provides students with online “practice” exams of 100 questions each that cover all four major content areas of the certification exam. Radiography SEAL was developed by experienced educators and offers detailed feedback on answers to help students gain greater understanding of the material. The online product also allows students to make notes and save questions for later. Exam topics include patient care, safety, patient interactions, image production and procedures. There are 15 unique Radiography SEAL assessments available at launch.

“Students have asked for this for a long time and we’re happy to be able to offer it as an enhancement to ASRT membership,’” said Myke Kudlas, M. Ed., R.T.(R)(QM), CIIP, PMP, ASRT associate executive director. “ASRT is already a trusted resource for educational materials, and we believe this will become an indispensable tool for students working to prepare for the radiography exam.”

Five Radiography SEAL exams are available at no additional charge with an ASRT student membership. Nonmembers may access the online reviews at $15 per exam.

For more information: www.asrt.org

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