News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | November 13, 2017

Aspect Imaging Receives CE Mark for Embrace Neonatal MRI System

System allows preparation and scanning of newborns without transporting them from the NICU

November 13, 2017 — Aspect Imaging announced last week that it received CE marking for the neonatal-dedicated Embrace Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) System, which enables preparation and scanning of newborns without having to transport them from the NICU. Embrace Neonatal MRI can now be used and sold in EU countries and in non-EU countries that rely on CE certification.

Aspect Imaging developed Embrace Neonatal MRI System to be placed inside the NICU to reduce the time and risks involved with transporting infants to an external facility in which traditional MRI scanners are typically situated. The system enables safer imaging of infants (weighing from 1 Kg to 4.5 Kg) and provides easier access for medical staff during the scanning process. The system can prep and scan in less than an hour. Intubated infants can also be scanned without disconnecting and reconnecting the tubing from the infant, due to the unique design of Embrace. The system is acoustically quieter during scanning compared to traditional whole-body scanners, and has a permanent magnet that is always active and thus requires no electrical, cryogenic or water cooling.

Embrace Neonatal MRI System does not require a special safety zone or an RF-shielded room, therefore, the system can be placed inside the NICU. Since the system is fully enclosed, medical device implants in close proximity (outside the magnet bore), are not required to be ‘MR Conditional’ or ‘MR Safe.’

The operating and maintenance costs of the system are much lower than conventional superconductor MRIs, according to Aspect, due to the company’s magnet technology, which requires no cooling system and has low power consumption.

Additionally, the Embrace Neonatal MRI system has an integrated, temperature-controlled incubator-like patient bed which minimizes movement of the baby.

For more information: www.aspectimaging.com

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