Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 04, 2019

Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator

SpellBound’s MRI Simulator reduces sedation rates and acclimates pediatric patients for MRIs in a fun, interactive way

Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator

June 4, 2019 — SpellBound, an Ann Arbor startup specializing in augmented reality (AR) tools for children in hospitals, has officially launched their AR MRI Simulator to market. SpellBound’s MRI Simulator is designed to reduce the high sedation rates for pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans by acclimating children to the experience in a way that is fun and interactive.

The blaring noises, tight spaces and unfamiliar environment of an MRI are often what produce fear and anxiety in children. The MRI Simulator eases these fears by familiarizing children with the process of an MRI, allowing them to walk through the procedure so they feel comfortable when the time comes for their appointment. SpellBound’s MRI simulator is accessible on smartphones and tablets, giving children and their caregivers the opportunity to engage with the simulator in the comfort of their own homes.

The inspiration for the simulator originated from feedback SpellBound has gathered from parents and clinicians who work with children struggling with MRIs. Christina York, CEO of SpellBound, said that it was particularly driven by the frustration families and hospital staff have around unnecessary sedation.

SpellBound’s MRI Simulator is ready to integrate into patient education programs and improve patient experience with the MRI.

For more information: www.spellboundar.com

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