News | Radiology Imaging | January 28, 2016

AHRA and Toshiba Announce 2015 Putting Patients First Grant Winners

Eighth annual program grant total reaches $490,000

Putting Patients First grant, 2015 winners, AHRA, Toshiba

January 28, 2016 — Seven leading healthcare providers have been selected as recipients of the eighth annual Putting Patients First grants, which will fund education and training programs to improve patient experience and safety in diagnostic imaging. The Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) and Toshiba America Medical Systems Inc. awarded one grant of up to $20,000 to an integrated delivery network (IDN) and six grants of up to $7,500—three focused on pediatric imaging, and three on overall patient care and safety in imaging.

The IDN grant has been awarded to:

  • University of Virginia Health System (Charlottesville, Va.) – will implement a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) education program targeting children and their parents to help reduce pediatric sedation and anesthesia during exams.

Pediatric and overall patient care grants have been awarded to:

  • Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (Los Angeles, Calif.) – will incorporate a quality improvement initiative to define an internal standard for reporting and recommendations when evaluating pediatric breast ultrasound images;
  • ProMedica Toledo Hospital (Toledo, Ohio) – will establish the Tranquility program, which will implement distraction and relaxation methods, such as music therapy, to reduce stress during radiation exposure to pediatric patients;
  • Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio) – will create patient-friendly MRI and computed tomography (CT) preparation rooms that will improve the comfort and overall experience of patients and families;
  • Boca Raton Regional Hospital (Boca Raton, Fla.) – will create an app or a series of short video clips, provided on a mobile device, that will educate patients on the various exams they are scheduled to have;
  • Holy Name Medical Center (Teaneck, N.J.) – will establish the Radiation Awareness to Reduce Radiation Exposure (R.A.R.E.) program, which will offer medical staff and community members extended training on medical imaging radiation; and
  • Jefferson Outpatient Imaging (Norriton, Pa.) – will purchase fleece jackets to keep patients warm and more comfortable during positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans. The jackets will also make intravenous injections easier with hidden zippers.

For more information: www.ahraonline.org, www.medical.toshiba.com

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