Technology | Digital Radiography (DR) | April 09, 2015

Agfa HealthCare and Hitachi Medical Systems America Partner in U.S. Market

Hitachi adding Agfa’s Musica-based radiography imaging systems to current MRI, CT and ultrasound portfolio

Agfa HealthCare, Hitachi Medical Systems America, sales and marketing agreeement

April 8, 2015 — Agfa HealthCare announced that it has entered into a sales and marketing agreement with Hitachi Medical Systems America Inc. Under the agreement, Hitachi will promote Agfa HealthCare's complete portfolio of digital radiography (DR) and computed radiography (CR) solutions to its community of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) customers in the United States. Agfa's service and applications organization will provide all support services, giving Hitachi customers access to Agfa's team of specialists.

Agfa's DR and CR portfolios are designed to meet the digital imaging needs of any size facility. In addition to complete imaging systems, Hitachi's customers will have access to Agfa's mobile DR systems and vendor-neutral DR retrofit solutions, which enable the upgrade of existing radiography systems to DR performance.

Agfa's DR solutions, when used with the patented Musica image processing and Cesium Iodide (CsI) detectors, allow dose reductions of up to 60 percent compared to conventional CR and DR technologies. In addition, Musica software shows excellent detail in low noise images that allow customers to consistently capture high-quality images.

For more information: www.agfahealthcare.com, www.hitachimed.com

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