Technology | June 10, 2015

AG Mednet Introduces Longitudinal Analysis for Submission Quality & Compliance Module

New functionality automates consistency and validity of imaging data throughout a clinical trial

June 10, 2015 - AG Mednet announced a new automated software that checks data across subject visits, at the source. AG Mednet Longitudinal Analysis, now included in the AG Mednet Submission Quality & Compliance (SQC) trial management system, makes determinations about the consistency and validity of imaging data as a trial progresses.

The software improves the quality and speed of clinical trials by automating imaging data collection and trial protocols. This new functionality ensures images are consistently performed at the right time with the right equipment to the right specifications.

AG Mednet's SQC software immediately detects errors that result in query stoppages and allows users to verify information, automatically update support systems including electronic data capture (EDC), and dramatically reduce the amount of queries returned for correction or re-scanning.

The introduction of AG Mednet Longitudinal Analysis adds these key features:

  • Tracking and recording image thickness: AG Mednet tracks image thickness so radiologists can easily check if the next time point slice thickness is the same as the one previously acquired. This automated consistency of image slice thickness ensures adherence to trial protocols;
  • Automated calendaring for time-dependent trials: For trials that require patient imaging to occur at specific intervals, AG Mednet Longitudinal Analysis allows professionals to determine appropriate scanning timing at the source; and
  • Automated tracking for imaging equipment: The software tracks the specific piece of equipment used to ensure images are consistent and checks if the same scanner and software release is used for all patients.

For more information: www.agmednet.com

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