News | March 16, 2010

ACR Officials to Help Lead Radiation Protection Policy

Milton J. Guiberteau, M.D., former ACR president and former ACR Nuclear Medicine Commission chair will serve a sixth term on the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

March 16, 2010 - The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has re-elected American College of Radiology (ACR) officials to lead the United States in making policy on radiation protection and measurements in medicine.

Louis K. Wagner, Ph.D., chair of the ACR Task Force on Radiation Risk Primer, member of the Image Wisely - ACR/RSNA Joint Task Force on Adult Radiation Dose, and member of the ACR Dose Registry Committee; and Milton J. Guiberteau, M.D., former ACR president and former ACR Nuclear Medicine Commission chair, were recently elected to serve a six-year term on the council of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

There are 100 elected members of the Council, who are recognized as leaders in many scientific fields of relevance to radiation protection and measurements in medicine, homeland security, environmental protection, nuclear technology, and public and occupational radiation exposures. Drs. Wagner and Guiberteau join several other ACR members and senior staff who presently serve on the NCRP.

The election was held at the 46th NCRP Annual Business Meeting on March 9, which was held in conjunction with the 2010 NCRP Annual Meeting on the topic of Communication of Radiation Benefits and Risks in Decision Making.

NCRP was chartered by Congress in 1964 under Public Law 88-376 to serve as a nonprofit organization that represents a national resource on topics related to radiation protection and radiation quantities, units and measurements.

For more information: www.NCRPonline.org

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