News | August 12, 2009

ACR Not Taking Official Position on Imaging Utilization Yet

August 12, 2009 - The American College of Radiology (ACR) wants to make it clear that "[a]ny information that ACR has offered its support or opposition to HR 3200 is incorrect," according to a statement issued on the ACR Web site.
The ACR states that it will "continue to educate congressional leaders that the imaging and radiation therapy provisions, including a raise in the equipment utilization rate assumption to 75 percent and a further 25 percent cut to contiguous imaging, are flawed ideas that will ultimately harm patient access to care – particularly in rural areas."

The College went on to say that "until negotiations regarding such provisions are complete or are clearly at an impasse" it "will not take an official position on the entire House bill."

For more information: www.acr.org

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