News | September 22, 2009

ACR Image Metrix Completes Successful Second Year as Imaging CRO

September 22, 2009 - ACR Image Metrix, an imaging contract research organization (CRO), exceeded its goals by initiating projects for over 30 pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies through its second full year of operation. Many of these awarded projects were “repeat” business from their existing client base.

ACR Image Metrix, a leader in imaging trial design, techniques, data extraction, management and analysis, was launched as a for-profit division of the American College of Radiology (ACR) in 2007 with profits being reinvested into the ACR Clinical Research Center.

“We have achieved a great deal of success throughout our first two years of operations as a state-of-the-art core imaging laboratory by focusing on more advanced imaging techniques,” said Mike Morales, ACR Image Metrix general manager. “The value of imaging in clinical trials is evident and is paving the way for better integration of molecular, functional and volumetric imaging in the drug discovery process.”

“This year we also expanded our office space and core imaging laboratories, allowing us greater capacity to handle larger global research projects,” said Veronique Cardon, ACR Image Metrix director of business development. “The new space establishes a world-class facility for ACR Image Metrix and the new imaging laboratories, which have doubled in size to meet the growing global demands for ACR Image Metrix services.”

The 10,000 square-foot facility also includes two dedicated learning laboratories designed for researchers to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to perform advanced imaging techniques. The core imaging laboratory has evolved to include a focus on the increasing challenges associated with advanced imaging capabilities in imaging clinical research today. These advanced imaging techniques include DCE-MRI, diffusion weighted/tensor imaging, FDG and FLT-PET and many more. In addition, ACR Image Metrix also offers services to the medical device industry in conducting clinical research to secure regulatory approvals for their new devices and software products such as CAD (computer aided detection).

“The new core imaging laboratory is a much needed expansion of our ACR Image Metrix global capabilities,” Morales said. “We have significantly increased our global capacity and are looking forward to a continued acceleration of new business in our third year of operation.”

For more information: www.acr.org and www.acr-imagemetrix.net

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