News | Clinical Decision Support | May 22, 2017

ACR Highlights Initial Results of R-SCAN Program at 2017 Annual Meeting

Free online tool provides access to appropriate use criteria-based clinical decision support

ACR Highlights Initial Results of R-SCAN Program at 2017 Annual Meeting

May 22, 2017 — The American College of Radiology (ACR) announced a series of sessions at the 2017 Annual Meeting that will highlight the initial results of the Radiology Support, Communication and Alignment Network (R-SCAN) program. Demonstrations will also be available during ACR 2017 — The Crossroads of Radiology, May 21-25 in Washington, D.C.  

Taking part in R-SCAN brings radiologists and referring clinicians together to improve imaging appropriateness based on Choosing Wisely topics and prepares them for the coming federal mandate that healthcare providers consult appropriate use criteria (AUC) before ordering advanced imaging for Medicare patients.

“R-SCAN’s use of AUC-based clinical decision support [CDS] promotes communication between radiologists and their referring providers and helps position radiologists as a resource to health system administrators, as medicine evolves from volume- to value-based care,” said Max Wintermark, M.D., R-SCAN clinical adviser.

Starting Jan. 1, 2018, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) will require referring providers to consult AUC prior to ordering computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography (PET) exams for Medicare patients. Healthcare providers may access imaging AUC via stand-alone electronic CDS systems or CDS software embedded in a physician’s electronic health record (EHR).

“R-SCAN participants gain free access to a customized version of the ACR Select CDS tool, the web-based version of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria. Using these tools, individuals may improve the appropriateness of imaging exams ordered and create project reports useful for implementing and quantifying changes to advance patient care,” noted Wintermark.

More than 130 practices nationwide — from small private practices to large academic centers — are participating in the free ongoing program. According to the ACR, R-SCAN has met its four-year grant goal of recruiting 4,000 radiologists.

Sessions at ACR 2017 focusing on the R-SCAN program will include:

  • R-SCAN reception: 10 practices present the status of their R-SCAN projects;
  • Transitioning to Value: Building Collaboration Around Evidence-Based Imaging; and
  • The MACRA/Quality Payment Program Workshop.

As part of the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) new Quality Payment Program, R-SCAN participants can also earn Improvement Activity credits (under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System) while demonstrating their commitment to providing value-based patient care.

For more information: www.rscan.org

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