News | Radiology Imaging | May 18, 2016

ACR Foundation Presents Global Humanitarian Awards

Individuals and organizations honored for positive global impact on radiology services at American College of Radiology Annual Meeting

May 18, 2016 — The American College of Radiology Foundation (ACRF) presented its individual Global Humanitarian Award to Kristen DeStigter, M.D., FACR, of Burlington, Vt., and Peter Dross, M.D., of Wilmington, Del. The World Federation of Pediatric Imaging and Rotary Club of Park Ridge, Ill., earned the group award.

The awards, honoring the individuals’ and groups’ positive global impact of radiology services, were announced at ACR 2016—The Crossroads of Radiology, May 15–19 in Washington, D.C.

“These individuals and organizations are dedicated to helping those in underserved and developing areas of the world gain improved access to quality radiological services,” said Howard B. Fleishon, M.D., MMM, FACR, chair of the ACR Foundation Executive Committee.

DeStigter is co-founder and president of Imaging the World, which created a new sustainable model for ultrasound imaging. The organization makes basic life-saving diagnosis accessible in the poorest regions of Africa. Since its founding, the program has successfully incorporated obstetric ultrasound examination into routine care at lower level health clinics in rural Uganda by training health workers to perform high-quality point-of-care ultrasound. DeStigter is the John P. and Kathryn H. Tampas Professor and interim chair of radiology at the University of Vermont/University of Vermont Medical Center, in Burlington, where she is an attending radiologist in the University of Vermont Medical Group.

Dross is a radiologist and member of the board of directors for Serving at the Crossroads, which built, equipped and supports a medical clinic with diagnostic imaging services in La Entrada, Honduras. An attending physician in the radiology department at Christiana Care Hospital in Wilmington, Del., Dross also is a clinical assistant professor of radiology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He has assisted in acquiring radiological equipment for the group and continues to provide on-site education and training to hospital staff.

The World Federation of Pediatric Imaging advances pediatric imaging education, provides training tools and impacts direct patient care by strengthening imaging initiatives. The federation was founded by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, Asian Oceanic Society, European Society of Paediatric Radiology and Latin American Society of Paedatric Radiology. The global advocate for pediatric imaging in low resource areas provides medical training and educational resources and has partnered with RAD-AID, Doctors Without Borders, the ACR Foundation and Imaging the World.

The Rotary Club of Park Ridge, Ill., started supporting radiology in 1999 by exploring the possibility of donating a World Health Imaging System for Radiology (WHIS-RAD) as a club project. The club has developed a reference manual, “Diagnostic Imaging in the Community,” and subsequently supported and raised funds for the installation of several WHIS-RAD systems in South America, Africa and Asia. Its members have engaged other Rotary International Clubs to support the need for diagnostic imaging systems in developing countries.

For more information: www.acr.org

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