News | Patient Engagement | August 09, 2017

ACR Establishes Education Committee for Patient- and Family-Centered Care

New committee will create learning opportunities, tools for radiologists to improve engagement and collaboration with patients

ACR Establishes Education Committee for Patient- and Family-Centered Care

August 9, 2017 — Members of the new Education Committee of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Commission on Patient- and Family-Centered Care are developing educational resources and tools to encourage radiology professionals to lead patient engagement and improve patient experience and satisfaction.

 “The call for patient-centered care is transforming the way radiology is practiced. The ACR is responding by developing a unified educational strategy to meet radiologists’ needs to put the concepts of patient engagement and value versus volume into practice,” said James V. Rawson, M.D., FACR, commission chair.

The new committee is chaired by Cheri L. Canon, M.D., FACR of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. It will work closely with members of the ACR Commission on Education to expand educational offerings concerning patient-centered care for practicing radiologists, residents and medical students. Matthew Cham, M.D., chair of that commission’s eLearning committee, from Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, is vice chair.

The committee members developed the Radiologist’s Toolkit for Patient- and Family-Centered Care, a website platform that provides resources and tools based on a radiologist’s unique practice setting and development needs to improve patient collaboration and inclusion. Committee members are working with Radiology-TEACHES (Technology-Enhanced Appropriateness Criteria Home for Education Simulation), an online portal that uses case vignettes in the ACR Radiology Curriculum Management System (RCMS) integrated with the ACR Select clinical decision support (CDS) to educate students in the process of ordering imaging studies appropriately.

Resources provided by the commission enhance radiologists’ understanding of — and participation in — new practice and payment models and advise on providing effective patient- and family-centered care.

For more information: www.acr.org

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