News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 25, 2020

ACR Announces COVID-19 Imaging Research Registry

Development of COVID-19 registry to empower practitioners and improve patient care

The American College of Radiology (ACR) Center for Research and Innovation (CRI) is pleased to announce the development of the COVID-19 Imaging Research Registry (CIRR), an effort by the ACR CRI and the ACR Data Science Institute in collaboration with the ACR and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). Sharyn Katz, M.D., director of research for thoracic radiology at the University of Pennsylvania, chairs the effort’s multiple-disciplinary steering committee, which includes representation from across the i

Getty Images

June 25, 2020 — The American College of Radiology (ACR) Center for Research and Innovation (CRI) is pleased to announce the development of the COVID-19 Imaging Research Registry (CIRR), an effort by the ACR CRI and the ACR Data Science Institute in collaboration with the ACR and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). Sharyn Katz, M.D., director of research for thoracic radiology at the University of Pennsylvania, chairs the effort’s multiple-disciplinary steering committee, which includes representation from across the imaging community as well as medical specialties focused on critical care and pulmonary medicine.

This registry is a primary step to advance the understanding, prevention and treatment of COVID-19. It is a cross-disciplinary initiative with collaborations extending beyond radiology to engage other clinical experts and diagnostic modalities, including clinical medicine, genetics, biomarker discovery, laboratory sciences and others. Participating sites will contribute demographic information, clinical data on signs and symptoms, imaging exams, laboratory test data and outcomes for U.S. patients tested for COVID-19. The registry is being constructed to allow for linkage of information to other existing COVID-19 registries and datasets, with use and development of common data elements.

“This registry will support further COVID-19 research and data. We are thrilled to work with our participating sites to empower our members and their radiology practices and help improve the quality of care for these patients,” said Etta D. Pisano, M.D., FACR, chief research officer of the ACR.

“The data registry will integrate imaging and clinical data, thus enabling investigators to address crucial questions related to the diagnosis, treatment and management of patients with COVID-19 through collaborative efforts. The ultimate goal is to aid patients affected by this emerging disease,” said Jane P. Ko, M.D., president of the STR.

The ACR CRI is prepared to leverage its extensive history in clinical research trials and observational studies, taking the next evolutionary step toward creating sustainable research data registries. The CIRR will provide fertile opportunity for discovery of new information about the clinical presentation and course of the virus in diverse populations across the U.S. In addition, it will serve as a resource for the development and testing of artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to be used to predict the course and severity of the disease in given populations and subpopulations and to develop early diagnosis models and potentially even targeted treatments.

The ACR is also taking the necessary steps to allow clinicians to earn credit under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) by contributing data to this registry. Information collected from the registry can ultimately help practices make data-driven improvements in the quality of patient care. 

Data collection for CIRR is anticipated to begin July 2020. Sites interested in participating can learn more about the registry and obtain participation materials on acr.org.

Related Content

A lung CT of a COVID-19 patient, showing ground-glass opacities in the lung from COVID pneumonia. Image courtesy of John Kim.

A lung CT of a COVID-19 patient, showing ground-glass opacities in the lung from COVID pneumonia. Image courtesy of John Kim.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — With increased lung CT exam paradigms being used in the current...
World's largest radiation oncology meeting will offer full conference on interactive platform October 25-28, 2020
News | ASTRO | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — Registration opens today for the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (...

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Mobile C-Arms | July 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Moblie C-arms have seen several advances over the past de
 Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unresponsive after surviving critical illness. Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now describe a patient with severe COVID-19 who, despite prolonged unresponsiveness and structural brain abnormalities, demonstrated functionally intact brain connections and weeks later he recovered the ability to follow commands

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (...
Several drivers will contribute to the growth of the teleradiology market in terms of penetration, revenue and read volumes over the next five years

Getty Images

Feature | Teleradiology | July 08, 2020 | By Arun Gill
Last year was a record year for the global...
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac
This is Figure 2 from the article in Radiology: Acute encephalopathy. A 60 year-old-man without history of seizures presenting with convulsion. (A-B) Multifocal areas of FLAIR hyperintensity in the right cerebellum (arrows in A), left anterior cingular cortex and superior frontal gyrus (arrows in B). (C-D) Restricted diffusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal and middle temporal gyrus (arrows in D) and right cerebellum (arrows in E), consistent with cerebellar diaschisis. F)  #COVID19

This is Figure 2 from the article in Radiology: Acute encephalopathy. A 60 year-old-man without history of seizures presenting with convulsion. (A-B) Multifocal areas of FLAIR hyperintensity in the right cerebellum (arrows in A), left anterior cingular cortex and superior frontal gyrus (arrows in B). (C-D) Restricted diffusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal and middle temporal gyrus (arrows in D) and right cerebellum (arrows in E), consistent with cerebellar diaschisis. F) No hemosiderin deposits in gradient echo sequences.

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 06, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Four recent radiology studies, from New York, Italy, Iran and China, show how...