News | Radiology Business | February 19, 2016

ACR 2016 Quality and Safety Sessions Tackle Value-based Care Models

Program covers the R-SCAN initiative, methods to increase patient satisfaction, radiation dose optimization

ACR 2016, quality and safety sessions, Crossroads of Radiology

February 19, 2016 — Quality and safety sessions at ACR 2016, the annual meeting of the American College of Radiology, will help radiology professionals enhance and strengthen their practices, providing specific strategies and tools to improve patient care and transition from volume- to value-based payment models.

“ACR 2016 quality and safety sessions focus on topics that patients care about, such as radiation dose optimization and methods to increase patient satisfaction,” said Cheri Canon, M.D., FACR, chair of the ACR 2016 Program Committee. “Radiology professionals must adapt to new alternative payment models, and ACR 2016 sessions help attendees navigate that transition,” she added. “Specifically, the Radiology Support, Communication and Alignment Network (R-SCAN) session details the opportunity for radiologists to participate in the continuum of care with referring clinicians and to measure and demonstrate value,” noted Canon.

ACR 2016 — The Crossroads of Radiology offers 23 quality and safety sessions, including a comprehensive five-part program that can be used to train specific individuals to serve their institutions as the radiology quality officer. Select ACR 2016 quality and safety sessions are listed below; the full list may be found in the program schedule:

  • Getting Ready for Value-Based Radiology (R-SCAN): Prepare now for changes in using clinical decision support to qualify for Medicare payment and the transition from volume- to value-based payment models;
  • Developing a Culture of Safety in Your Practice;
  • Transitioning to Value – The How: Using Quality Tools and QI Project Work (Root Cause Analysis and Event Reporting, Mega Tools: Lean and Six Sigma, Evidence-based Radiology);
  • Advancing the Practice of Lung Cancer Screening;
  • QI/QI Systems and Implementation: What We Need to Know;
  • Incidental Findings 2016: Directions and New Chest and Thyroid Recommendations;
  • Multiparametric MRI of the Prostate: Interpretation and Reporting Using PI-RADS V2;
  • Strategies in Imaging the Moving Child — Imaging 3.0;
  • Performance Improvement & the Diagnostic Imaging Improvement Community; and
  • Radiation Dose Optimization Strategies in Medical Imaging.

ACR’s annual all-member meeting will be held May 15–19 in Washington, D.C.

For more information: www.acr.org

Related Content

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 12, 2019
How smart algorithms might reduce the burden of modern practice
Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Collage depicts broad applications in machine learning or deep learning (DL) that can be applied to advanced medical imaging technologies. Size of the liver and its fat fraction — 22 percent — (top middle in collage) can be quantified automatically using an algorithm developed by Dr. Albert Hsiao and his team at the University of California San Diego. This and other information that might be mined by DL algorithms from CT and MR images could help personalize patients’ treatment. Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 11, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are chock full of information that might be used
Imaging Technology News Named 2019 Regional and National Azbee Awards Finalist
News | Radiology Business | March 08, 2019
March 8, 2019 — Imaging Technology News (ITN) was named a finalist in multiple categories across pr
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 08, 2019
Why CT angiography cannot replace invasive angiography
Carestream Health has signed an agreement to sell its healthcare information systems (HCIS) business to Philips Healthcare. Image by geralt on Pixabay

Carestream Health has signed an agreement to sell its healthcare information systems (HCIS) business to Philips Healthcare. This includes its radiology and cardiology PACS and reporting software. Image by geralt on Pixabay 

News | Radiology Business | March 07, 2019
Carestream Health has signed an agr