News | Radiology Business | February 19, 2016

ACR 2016 Quality and Safety Sessions Tackle Value-based Care Models

Program covers the R-SCAN initiative, methods to increase patient satisfaction, radiation dose optimization

ACR 2016, quality and safety sessions, Crossroads of Radiology

February 19, 2016 — Quality and safety sessions at ACR 2016, the annual meeting of the American College of Radiology, will help radiology professionals enhance and strengthen their practices, providing specific strategies and tools to improve patient care and transition from volume- to value-based payment models.

“ACR 2016 quality and safety sessions focus on topics that patients care about, such as radiation dose optimization and methods to increase patient satisfaction,” said Cheri Canon, M.D., FACR, chair of the ACR 2016 Program Committee. “Radiology professionals must adapt to new alternative payment models, and ACR 2016 sessions help attendees navigate that transition,” she added. “Specifically, the Radiology Support, Communication and Alignment Network (R-SCAN) session details the opportunity for radiologists to participate in the continuum of care with referring clinicians and to measure and demonstrate value,” noted Canon.

ACR 2016 — The Crossroads of Radiology offers 23 quality and safety sessions, including a comprehensive five-part program that can be used to train specific individuals to serve their institutions as the radiology quality officer. Select ACR 2016 quality and safety sessions are listed below; the full list may be found in the program schedule:

  • Getting Ready for Value-Based Radiology (R-SCAN): Prepare now for changes in using clinical decision support to qualify for Medicare payment and the transition from volume- to value-based payment models;
  • Developing a Culture of Safety in Your Practice;
  • Transitioning to Value – The How: Using Quality Tools and QI Project Work (Root Cause Analysis and Event Reporting, Mega Tools: Lean and Six Sigma, Evidence-based Radiology);
  • Advancing the Practice of Lung Cancer Screening;
  • QI/QI Systems and Implementation: What We Need to Know;
  • Incidental Findings 2016: Directions and New Chest and Thyroid Recommendations;
  • Multiparametric MRI of the Prostate: Interpretation and Reporting Using PI-RADS V2;
  • Strategies in Imaging the Moving Child — Imaging 3.0;
  • Performance Improvement & the Diagnostic Imaging Improvement Community; and
  • Radiation Dose Optimization Strategies in Medical Imaging.

ACR’s annual all-member meeting will be held May 15–19 in Washington, D.C.

For more information: www.acr.org

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