News | Medical 3-D Printing | January 23, 2018

3D Systems Introduces DICOM to 3-D Printing Functionality at RSNA 2017

Volume Virtual Reality software speeds visualization of digital 3-D models created from patient scans

 

3D Systems Introduces DICOM to 3-D Printing Functionality at RSNA 2017

January 23, 2018 – At the 2017 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago, 3D Systems announced a new D2P (DICOM to PRINT) technology that helps clinicians and radiologists quickly create accurate, digital 3-D anatomical models from medical imaging data.

The company also announced its new Volume Virtual Reality (VR) technology that allows physicians to upload patient scan data to D2P and immediately visualize medical datasets in virtual reality without time-consuming pre-processing or segmentation. It produces results similar to those shown on high-end imaging workstations, but is rendered in virtual reality compared to standard flat screens.

Visualization in virtual reality greatly enhances 3-D understanding of structure and scale and can be used as part of routine examinations, or preoperative planning of surgical procedures. This new technology is available now as part of an integrated application through 3D Systems’ D2P offering.

Also announced at RSNA, 3D Systems signed an agreement with Philips to accelerate medical progress in improved planning and patient outcomes. Philips customers now have seamless access to expedite 3-D printing to create physical 3-D models to help physicians understand patient anatomy that is difficult to visualize, and deliver personalized medicine in complex cases.

At RSNA, 3D Systems showcased examples of patient-specific models in three materials, each printed using a different technology, including SLA (Stereolithography) using a biocompatible resin with the ability to highlight vital structures. These models can be sterilized for reference in the operating room.

“In just over a decade, 3-D printing has made patient-specific anatomical models routine. From pre-surgical planning to using the models as guides in the operating room, these tools have made complex procedures more simple and precise,” said Evan Garfein, M.D., chief, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Montefiore Health System. “With the arrival of D2P software we now have advanced software and 3-D printers that are accessible to surgeons at the point of care. It is the beginning of a new era in personalized medicine and surgical 3-D printing.”

For more information: www.3dsystems.com

Related Content

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Videos | Advanced Visualization | May 16, 2019
This is an example of how virtual reality is being used in neuro-radiology to better evaluate patients using advanced
Bioprinting research from the lab of Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller featured a proof-of-principle — a scale-model of a lung-mimicking air sac with airways and blood vessels that never touch yet still provide oxygen to red blood cells.

Bioprinting research from the lab of Rice University bioengineer Jordan Miller featured a proof-of-principle — a scale-model of a lung-mimicking air sac with airways and blood vessels that never touch yet still provide oxygen to red blood cells. Image courtesy of Jordan Miller/Rice University.

News | Medical 3-D Printing | May 03, 2019
Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3-D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique...
A 3-D printed tungsten X-ray system collimator. 3D printed, additive manufacturing for medical imaging.

A 3-D printed tungsten X-ray system collimator. The tungsten alloy powder is printed into the form desired and is laser fused so it can be machined and finished. Previously, making collimators from Tungsten was labor intensive because it required working with sheets of the metal to create the collimator matrix. 

Feature | Medical 3-D Printing | April 29, 2019 | By Steve Jeffery
In ...
California Hospital Adds Machine-Vision Image Guided Surgery Platform to New Operating Suites
News | Advanced Visualization | April 26, 2019
Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute at Hoag in Newport Beach, Calif., announced the addition of the 7D Surgical...
Graphic courtesy of Pixabay

Graphic courtesy of Pixabay

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | April 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
...
Technological Advancements Expected to Drive Virtual Reality Growth in Healthcare
News | Advanced Visualization | April 04, 2019
Increasing demand for innovative diagnostic techniques, neurological disorders and increasing disease awareness are...