News | August 03, 2009

3D Cell Imaging Detects Early Stage Lung Cancer

August 3, 2009 - A new lung cancer detection device, the Lung Cell Evaluation Device (LuCED), uses an automated 3D cell imaging platform aimed at detection of pre-cancerous and cancerous cells in sputum.

The technology was developed by researchers at VisionGate, Inc., in collaboration with scientists from the University of Washington. Michael Meyer, M.S., will present a study on LuCED on Tuesday, August, 4, 2009, at the 13th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC), organized by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in San Francisco, Calif.

In this study, the investigators assessed a large number of normal cells and cancer cells. LuCED automatically produces 3D cell volumetric data, allowing for the measurement of 3D cellular features that correlate with abnormal conditions. The cell measurements are then translated into an analytical score that reflects the patient’s cancer risk. LuCED, based on 3D cell analysis, produced near perfect discrimination between normal and cancer cell morphology.

“Based on abnormal cell prevalence counts in sputum from patients with cancer, we estimate that the LuCED test demonstrates near-perfect specificity (no false positives) while maintaining sensitivity that exceeds 90 percent for patients with lung cancer cells in their sputum,” says Michael Meyer, M.S, lead author and vice president for image engineering at VisionGate. “This type of 3D analysis provides an unobstructed and unambiguous representation of normal and abnormal cell morphology, making the LuCED test an effective means to guide the physicians’ further diagnostic workup, including diagnostic CT or bronchoscopy.”

For more information: www.spectrumscience.com

Related Content

TeraRecon Unveils iNtuition AI Data Extractor
News | Advanced Visualization | July 03, 2019
Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced visualization company TeraRecon announced its new iNtuition AI Data Extractor...
A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model.

A 3-D printed model (left) and a model constructed in augmented reality (right), both of a kidney with a tumor. In both models, the kidney is clear; the tumor is visible in purple on the AR model and in white on the 3-D printed model. Photo courtesy of Nicole Wake, Ph.D.

Feature | Advanced Visualization | July 02, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Three-dimensional (3-D) printing and...

Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Feature | Molecular Imaging | July 01, 2019 | By Sharvari Rale
Diagnostic procedures have always been a cornerstone of early prognosis and patient triaging.
TeraRecon Receives FDA Clearance for Northstar AI Results Explorer
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | June 20, 2019
Advanced visualization and artificial intelligence (AI) technology provider TeraRecon has successfully completed a U.S...
Materialise Receives FDA Clearance for Cardiovascular Planning Software Suite
Technology | Advanced Visualization | June 13, 2019
Three-dimensional (3-D) printing software and solutions company Materialise has received U.S. Food and Drug...
Medivis SurgicalAR Gets FDA Clearance
Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 10, 2019
Medivis announced that its augmented reality (AR) technology platform for surgical applications, SurgicalAR, has...
Ann Arbor Startup Launches Augmented Reality MRI Simulator
Technology | Virtual and Augmented Reality | June 04, 2019
SpellBound, an Ann Arbor startup specializing in augmented reality (AR) tools for children in hospitals, has officially...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Videos | Advanced Visualization | May 16, 2019
This is an example of how virtual reality is being used in neuro-radiology to better evaluate patients using advanced