News | November 05, 2013

2013 National Radiologic Technology Week Highlights Radiologic Technologists' Drive for Excellence

X-ray

November 5, 2013 -- Radiologic technologists' ongoing efforts to provide excellent patient care inspired the theme of this year's National Radiologic Technology Week celebration, Nov. 3-9, 2013.

"R.T.s: Positioning Ourselves for Excellence" captures medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals' relentless drive to achieve excellence in all areas of the profession. The American Society of Radiologic Technologists chose the theme based on a recommendation from a panel of veteran R.T.s.

"Radiologic technologists continually strive to improve their skill sets and enhance patient care, and this year's NRTW theme encompasses those two goals," said ASRT President Julie Gill, Ph.D., R.T.(R)(QM).

Established by the ASRT in 1979, NRTW commemorates the discovery of the x-ray by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen on Nov. 8, 1895. It also serves as an event to honor the history of the profession and the personnel who perform medical imaging exams and provide radiation therapy treatments.

This year's NRTW coincides with the launch of ASRT's ACE campaign. Created to educate patients about the radiologic technologist's role on the health care team, ACE is an easy acronym that reminds R.T.s to Announce their name, Communicate their credentials and Explain what they're going to do.

As part of the campaign, every ASRT member will receive materials to promote the profession and communicate with patients. In October, members received a poster that educates patients about R.T.s' role in providing top-notch patient care. In November, they'll get cards that patients can use to record their medical imaging and radiation therapy exams.

"The timing of the ACE campaign launch and NRTW allows R.T.s to celebrate the profession and educate their fellow health care professionals and the public about the medical imaging and radiation therapy profession," said Gill.

To celebrate NRTW, ASRT is offering a 50 percent discount on its popular continuing education product "Basics of Radiation Protection." The product is available in the ASRT Store and the offer is open to members and nonmembers through Jan. 31.

In addition, the ASRT reviewed more than 150 live-lecture CE activities at no cost in the months leading up to NRTW. CE sponsors will present the approved activities during the week of Nov. 3-9.

The ASRT offers a number of free resources to help technologists celebrate NRTW.

For more information: www.asrt.org/nrtw

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