Feature | February 11, 2010

ITN Celebrates 50th Year in Medical Imaging

Sam Friedman, M.D., Nuclear Radiologist, is chief technology officer at Pitts Radiology in Columbia, S.C.

Carter Newton, M.D., FACC, is assistant professor of radiology and assistant clinical professor of cardiology at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Greg Rose, M.D., Ph.D., has served as president and CEO of NightRays since its inception in 2004.

You may have heard today’s 50 is the new 30. While you try to justify that one, we are taking this moment to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Imaging Technology News.
Formerly named ‘MEEN’ magazine, which stood for Medical Electronics and Equipment News, not its demeanor, the publication eventually spun off the brand, Imaging Technology News (ITN). The new journal focused on the vertical medical imaging market and earned its status as “The Technology Solutions Resource for Medical Imaging Professionals.”
Join us as we celebrate our continued coverage of new and emerging medical imaging equipment and IT solutions designed to support you in the delivery of patient care.

New Editorial Advisory Board Members
The end of a decade marks the beginning of a new era. Guiding ITN’s editorial line requires a strong cabinet of advisors. I am very proud and privileged to introduce to you the newest members of the ITN Editorial Advisory Board.
Carter Newton, M.D., FACC, is assistant professor of radiology and assistant clinical professor of cardiology at the University of Arizona in Tucson. After 18 years of group adult cardiology practice in Los Angeles, Calif., he created his own medical imaging consultancy, specializing in CT Angiography. He lectures in the U.S. and internationally on the business and technical aspects of performing and reading CT cardiac scans; he puts on courses and tutorials for Level 2 and Level 3 CTA certification; and he provides telecardiology peer review and quality assurance to hospitals and imaging centers. He holds American Boards in Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Cardiac CT. He serves of the Education and Credentialing Committee of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.
Contact email: [email protected]

Greg Rose, M.D., Ph.D., has served as president and CEO of NightRays since its inception in 2004. His scientific background includes a physics B.S. from Bucknell University, a Ph.D. in physics from Texas A&M University, physics teaching of Electricity and Magnetism, General Physics, and Astronomy, and defense research for the U.S. Army. His medical background includes medical school at UTMB, radiology residency at the Baylor University Medical Center, and an MRI fellowship at the Mayo Clinic. He has presented research at Physics and Medical conferences. He has published work in the fields of solid state theory, laser theory, mammography, teleradiology, and MRE. He holds a patent and patents pending. He is the chief architect of the NightRays RIS. He has been in private radiology practice since 1998 and serves as one of the interpreting radiologists for NightRays.
Contact email: [email protected].

Sam Friedman, M.D., Nuclear Radiologist, is chief technology officer at Pitts Radiology in Columbia, S.C. His medical background includes completing his fellowship in Nuclear Medicine and Radiology residency at University of Alabama in Birmingham, after serving as the doctor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas five years. He is a member of the American College of Radiology, American Roentgen Ray Society, Radiological Society of North America, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, and Society of Nuclear Medicine. He is also well known as Dr. Dalai for his popular Dalai’s PACS Blog at www.doctordalai.blogspot.com.
Contact email: [email protected].

Related Content

DrChrono and 3D4Medical Partner to Bring 3-D Interactive Modeling to Physician Practices
News | Advanced Visualization | March 18, 2019
DrChrono Inc. and 3D4Medical have teamed up so practices across the United States can access 3-D interactive modeling...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Sponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | March 15, 2019
As a VNA, GE Healthcare Ce
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 12, 2019
How smart algorithms might reduce the burden of modern practice
Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Collage depicts broad applications in machine learning or deep learning (DL) that can be applied to advanced medical imaging technologies. Size of the liver and its fat fraction — 22 percent — (top middle in collage) can be quantified automatically using an algorithm developed by Dr. Albert Hsiao and his team at the University of California San Diego. This and other information that might be mined by DL algorithms from CT and MR images could help personalize patients’ treatment. Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 11, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are chock full of information that might be used
FDA Grants Breakthrough Designation to Paige.AI
News | Digital Pathology | March 08, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) startup company Paige.AI has been granted Breakthrough Device designation by the U.S. Food...