Feature | November 16, 2018 | By Greg Freiherr

Interventional Radiology Profile Rises in Medicine and at RSNA Meeting

Greg Freiherr

Greg Freiherr

For the first time at the RSNA meeting, vendors of interventional products will have a dedicated area in which to display and demonstrate their products. This IR zone, as it is being called, is supposed to make it easier for interventional radiologists to work with relevant companies.

John A. Kaufman, M.D., chair of the Department of Interventional Radiology and director of the Dotter Interventional Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, discussed this change in exhibitor space and the rising profile of interventional radiology in medical practice in the ITN PODCAST Hear and Now: Intervention Rising.

“For many years, I think interventional radiologists have had a sense that there is not a lot for me here, particularly on the exhibit floor,” Kaufman said. “The programming has really developed beautifully. (There’s been a) big emphasis on oncology and other aspects of interventional radiology. But the floor for the interventionalist has not been as interesting.”

That will change at RSNA 2018 and the change will be a positive one for interventional radiology. “It supports the whole concept that we have been trying to promote of this really tight relationship,” he said between mainstream diagnostic radiology and interventional radiology, a change exemplified by the Society’s dedication of a part of the exhibit floor to interventional products.  Recent changes in certification by the American Board of Radiology (ABR) support this burgeoning relationship.

Notably, the ABR has recently created a new certification, called Interventional Radiology/Diagnostic Radiology (IR/DR). With its creation, IR/DR joins just three other specialties certified by the Board – Diagnostic Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics.  The resulting new residency options available to medical students have created “tremendous interest” in interventional radiology.

“Very large numbers of people are applying for this,” Kaufman said. Also rising, he said, is the quality of applicants: “Not only are the numbers way up, but we feel that the people coming in are phenomenal.”

Kaufman described the current situation as the start of a new era, one exemplified by this new certification, which combines both diagnostic radiology and interventional radiology.

“We feel that by having the IR/DR certificate the interventional radiology residency — which is really an interventional and diagnostic radiology residency — has positioned the house of radiology to be well-suited to provide (minimally invasive) care,” he said, noting optimism about the future of this newly certified specialty.  “I’m really hoping this leads not only to more individuals and people performing at a high level in clinical practice, but also really fleshing out the research side of the specialty and developing a lot of the fundamental knowledge base that we think is important.”

Listen to the PODCAST Hear and Now: Intervention Rising

Listen to the first PODCAST PET Ready To Expand Into Sports Medicine And Beyond

For additional information, read the article PET Ready To Expand Into Sports Medicine And Beyond

Related Content

A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosai

Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosaic pattern with a bronchocentric distribution to the GGO (white arrow, d) involving both central and peripheral lung parenchyma with pleural effusions (black small arrow, d). image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 — In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association wit
n support of Mayo Clinic’s digital health and practice transformation initiatives, the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology has initiated an enterprise-wide digital pathology implementation of the Sectra digital slide review and image storage and management system to enable digital pathology. 
News | Enterprise Imaging | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 —  In support of Mayo Clinic’s digital health
Two leading organizations join forces to drive future telehealth strategies across hospital settings into the home propelled by COVID-19
News | Teleradiology | June 18, 2020
June 18, 2020 — Philips announced it has once again joined forces with the American Telemedicine Association (...
Axial FLAIR in four different COVID-19 patients. A) 58-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR hyperintensities located in the left medial temporal lobe. B) 66-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR ovoid hyperintense lesion located in the central part of the splenium of the corpus callosum. C) 71-year old woman with pathological wakefulness after sedation: extensive and confluent supratentorial white matter FLAIR hyperintensities (arrows). Association with leptomeningeal enhancement (stars

Axial FLAIR in four different COVID-19 patients. A) 58-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR hyperintensities located in the left medial temporal lobe. B) 66-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR ovoid hyperintense lesion located in the central part of the splenium of the corpus callosum. C) 71-year old woman with pathological wakefulness after sedation: extensive and confluent supratentorial white matter FLAIR hyperintensities (arrows). Association with leptomeningeal enhancement (stars) D) 61-year old man with confusion: hyperintense lesions involving both middle cerebellar peduncles. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 16, 2020
June 16, 2020 — Current data on central nervous system (CNS) involvement in...
New software version for Vantage Orian 1.5T also offers cybersecurity solutions to protect patient data
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 15, 2020
June 15, 2020 — Hospitals and institutions are continually looking for ways to improve diagnostic imaging throughput,