Feature | April 21, 2014

GE Healthcare Installs 10,000th Global Premium Mobile C-Arm Imaging System

GE Healthcare’s OEC 9900 Elite is used in minimally invasive surgery around the world

GE Healthcare celebrated the production of its 10,000th OEC 9900 Elite mobile imaging system globally, following installation at a prestigious hospital in Pittsburgh. Mobile C-arms are digital X-ray imaging systems used to see inside the body during surgery and interventional procedures, aiding surgeons in precise surgical repair. The delivery of this system marks a significant clinical milestone because the global use of this high-quality system is helping promote the advancement of minimally invasive surgery in all regions of the world.

The OEC 9900 Elite touts superb image quality in a highly automated machine and was named the overall best Mobile C-arm, ranking number one in image quality, and emitting the least amount of radiation in a study presented at the North American Spine Society’s Annual meeting in 2012.  With nearly 40,000 OEC C-arms in use globally, the OEC 9900 Elite’s foundation has a familiar user interface, allowing Radiologic technologists and Surgeons to become comfortable using the system very quickly. Beyond ease of use, which is critical in a fast paced and intense OR setting, the OEC 9900 Elite has unique image optimization features and critical dose management capabilities — all key attributes that help clinicians provide the best care for their patients.

“We are incredibly proud today as we reflect on the significant contributions our business has made to improving health across the globe,” said Carrie Eglinton Manner, President and CEO of GE Healthcare Surgery. “The founders of OEC had a vision for enabling better surgery, and we still work every single day to make that vision real. We shipped the 10,000th OEC 9900 Elite, with our heartfelt wishes that this and all OEC C-arms will help improve the health of people in their communities.” The OEC 9900 Elite C-arm is used in nearly 4,000 facilities around the world including hospitals, prestigious medical teaching Institutions, ambulatory surgery centers and physician offices.

More than 1,100 GE Healthcare Surgery employees around the world celebrated this latest milestone and the role OEC C-arms play in helping dedicated healthcare professionals deliver exceptional care for their patients. Whether in the course of routine surgeries or during events like the earthquake recovery in Haiti and the 2010 Winter Olympics, “We are humbled to have OEC C-arms consistently chosen as a key tool in improving global health. Whether clinicians use one of our ten thousand premium C-arms in place today, one of the tens of thousands of OEC C-arms prior to them, or one of the future C-arms we will develop, we are on a mission to continually help advance innovation in surgical care.” stated Eglinton Manner.

The comes in the OEC Elite 9900 Ortho/Surgery and the OEC Elite 9900 Vascular configurations.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com.

 

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