News | April 01, 2015

Xifin, vRad Partner to Integrate Pathology, Radiology Diagnostic Reports

Online platform will facilitate physician collaboration and improve diagnostic accuracy for referring clinicians and their patients

April 1, 2015 — vRad (Virtual Radiologic) and Xifin Inc. announced the companies intend to create an online collaborative clinical workflow to facilitate consolidated diagnostic reports (CDR) of radiology, pathology and clinical laboratory results. The online solution will initially be designed to support referring oncologists and their patients.

Radiology and pathology images and reports are essential to facilitate accurate diagnoses for appropriate diagnostic management and treatment decisions for cancer patients. By integrating all testing results and digital images from both diagnostic specialties, the CDR will provide a more efficient, collaborative tool for physicians, breaking down current diagnostic silos. The CDR will allow pathologists and radiologists to provide the full picture of patient diagnostics, highlight and reduce clinical discordance, and enable faster and more precise diagnoses.

While pathology and radiology workflows have traditionally been independent of each other, the accelerated adoption of digital pathology, similar to the digital transformation radiology experienced in the 2000s, has opened the opportunity for both companies to develop the CDR using their existing technology platforms: Xifin’s ProNet, a comprehensive online information and digital consultation forum for global pathology; and vRad’s patented clinical and imaging global platform.

For more information: www.vrad.com; www.xifin.com

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