News | January 31, 2007

X-Ray, Stereotaxis Magnetic System Join Forces in Cath Lab

January 30,1, 2007 - Philips announced today that it has paired its ceiling-mounted Philips Allura Xper FD10 X-ray system with the Stereotaxis Niobe system using magnetic navigation capabilities, for the installations of new cardiac electrophysiology (EP) labs designed to improve catheter navigation within the heart’s chambers during complex interventional cardiovascular procedures.

The combined system installed in the EP labs, one at University of California San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, and the other at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Boston, are employed by creating a magnetic field through the patient that interacts with a small magnet tip in the catheter to align and place catheters and guidewires through the heart and the coronary vasculature. This is necessary for surgical treatment of rapid rhythm of the heart (supraventricular tachycardia), as well as more complex procedures such as treating a fast heartbeat originating in the ventricles (ventricular tachycardia) or irregular muscle contractions in the heart (atrial arrhythmias).

Burkhardt et al., Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology (JCE), 2006; Thornton et al., Heart Rhythm, 2006 Ernst et al., Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology (JCE), 2005: Euro pace 2005

“We use the Niobe system in 40 percent of cases in the lab, and in that time the combination Allura Xper and Niobe system has proven to be highly reliable and has helped our staff to better manage the lab,” said Dr. Charles Haffajee, director of cardiac electrophysiology program, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital. “Our clinicians are also able to use a rotational scan, which gives a 3D-view of the coronary vasculature, instead of standard 2-D projections from one angle. As published studies by Drs. John D. Carroll and James T. Maddux indicate, rotational scans help solve 2D’s misrepresentation of reality and provide an interventional tool, which helps to reduce contrast and dose.” (John D. Carroll, MD, James T. Maddux, MD, et al. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 62:167–174 (2004))

“We are very excited to provide such a comprehensive system for our patients and staff,” said Dr. Jeffrey Olgin, associate professor of Medicine and chief of Cardiac Electrophysiology, University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center. “The ceiling-mounted system reduces the footprint in the lab and allows the possibility of using both interventional cardiology and electrophysiology procedures. Another important benefit of this system is increased patient accessibility during the procedures, which improves the work environment of patient and staff.”

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