News | September 03, 2014

Willis-Knighton Cancer Center and IBA Complete Acceptance Testing for ProteusONE

Willis-Knighton Cancer Center and IBA Complete Acceptance Testing for ProteusONE

Willis-Knighton Cancer Center

September 3, 2014 — IBA (Ion Beam Applications SA) announced that Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, La., and IBA have completed acceptance testing of the first ProteusONE system ahead of schedule, opening the way to final commissioning and patient treatment with the most advanced compact image-guided IMPT (intensity-modulated proton therapy) solution. The acceptance testing occurred less than 14 months after on-site delivery of the accelerator.

ProteusONE is IBA's single-room proton therapy system that encompasses the latest in targeted proton therapy technologies, including IBA's IMPT and adapT Insight, an advanced image guidance platform for proton therapy. Five units have already been sold by IBA, in Shreveport; Nice, France; Taiwan; and two in Japan.

“We are delighted to have completed the rigorous acceptance testing of ProteusONE at Willis-Knighton Cancer Center ahead of schedule. It is the talent and determination of our teams at IBA and the successful collaboration with Willis-Knighton’s staff that made it possible to achieve this significant milestone. We very much look forward to the first patients being treated at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center later this year,” said Yves Jongen, founder and chief research officer of IBA.

Added Lane R. Rosen, M.D., director of radiation oncology at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center: “We are very excited to have IMPT become an available option for our patients. Both Willis-Knighton and IBA teams have been partnering at each step to ensure a smooth transition from installation to acceptance testing, leading to a possible first patient treatment in the very near future.”

For more information: www.iba-worldwide.com

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