News | Breast Imaging | October 10, 2018

"Where's My Mammogram?" Campaign Helps Women Own Breast Health Records

Mammosphere leads campaign to provide tools to women to secure their own breast images and health history from their physician offices

"Where's My Mammogram?" Campaign Helps Women Own Breast Health Records

October 10, 2018 — Mammosphere launched “Where’s My Mammogram?,” a public service campaign to help women obtain copies of prior diagnostic breast images from their physicians. The campaign is intended to empower women to become active participants in their breast health, and to improve clinical outcomes of regular breast cancer screening for women over 40.

Under current federal law, women can request copies of their mammograms from their doctors, who are obligated to provide them in whatever format patients request at a reasonable expense, and within 30 days. Having prior images and health history available to clinicians at the time of diagnosis has long been shown to significantly improve clinical outcomes and save lives.

“Our campaign, which will run during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, is intended to help women play an active role in managing their breast health,” said Kathryn Pearson Peyton, M.D., a breast-imaging radiologist who founded Mammosphere and serves as chair of its Women’s Health Advisory Board. “Many women aren’t aware of the importance of having their past mammograms available for comparison at the time of screening. And navigating the healthcare system to get those prior medical records can be daunting. Where’s My Mammogram? aims to make it easier.”

When doctors have immediate access to prior breast images, false positives are reduced by 40 to 60 percent; 30 percent of actual cancers are caught earlier, and diagnosis of breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes is reduced by 12 percent, according to clinical studies.

Information on how to obtain prior diagnostic images and other useful information is available at http://info.lifeimage.com/mammosphere/wheres-my-mammogram.

Nancy M. Cappello, Ph.D., founder of Are You Dense Inc. and Are You Dense Advocacy Inc., said, “We join in supporting Mammosphere’s efforts to ensure that doctors and their patients have readily available access to complete patient prior imaging, enabling informed breast health decisions without delay.”

Tools available at the website include a letter template for requesting breast images in writing, a telephone script for asking for images by phone, and facts about the importance of having prior images available during regular breast cancer screenings.

Women are guaranteed access to their health records, including prior diagnostic breast images, under HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, a landmark federal law regarding health records.

For more information: www.mammosphere.com

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