Webinar | Digital Radiography (DR)| September 03, 2019

WEBINAR: The Benefits of Advanced Automation in X-ray

Siemens webinar examines how new technology can help improve workflow, increase staff satisfaction, deliver safer patient exams and protect hospital reputation

The Siemens Ysio Max digital radiography system.

The Webinar "Benefits of Advanced Automation in X-ray" will be presented Wednesday, Sept. 25 at 1 p.m. Central Time.

 

Webinar Overview:

Patients and referring physicians alike expect local health care to be delivered with the best technology possible. Failure to embrace advanced automation threatens an imaging center's ability to expand precision medicine and improve the patient experience, putting their reputation at risk.

Join Linda Doucette, Clinical Applications Specialist at Siemens Healthineers for a webinar that explores the advantages of advanced automation in X-ray. She will discuss how advanced automation features help imaging departments improve workflow, increase staff satisfaction, deliver safer patient exams, and protect reputation in the community.

Register for this Webinar

 
Speaker:
Linda Doucette is a licensed and registered radiology technologist. She is the point person in the call center that directs application support for radiography, fluoroscopy, urology and mobile X-ray products from Siemens Healthineers customers. Linda’s career at Siemens Healthineers spans more than seven years. She spent her first five years with the company as a field applications trainer, providing application training for radiography and fluoroscopy systems in the field. Her experience with advanced automation features includes exclusive work with the Ysio Max and Multitom Rax systems. Linda holds a BSRT, radiology technology from St. Joseph’s College and an associate degree in radiology technology from Mass Bay Community College.

 

 

Register for this Webinar

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