News | April 01, 2008

Verathon Offers Enhanced Ultrasound BladderScan Instrument to Help Decrease Urinary Tract Infections

April 2, 2008 – Verathon expanded its BladderScan bladder volume instrument product line with a new Small Child Mode for the BVI 9400 bladder volume instrument, which was debuted at the Association of peri-Operative Registered Nurses (AORN) conference in Anaheim, CA this week.

Small Child Mode reportedly enables healthcare providers to measure bladder volume noninvasively on children weighing less than 60 pounds and standing less than 48 inches high with the same instrument used for adult patients. The enhanced BladderScan BVI 9400 has a color console, improved aiming, on-board video tutorials and an array of exam recording options.

Urinary catheter-related UTIs are estimated to total over 561,000 per year and account for more than 40 percent of all nosocomial infections. According to a recent national study in the American Journal of Medicine, UTIs are the most common hospital-acquired infection and cost the healthcare system between $424 million to $451 million annually.

BladderScan instruments, which help monitor post-operative urinary retention and evaluate common urological conditions, have been proven to reduce the rate of nosocomial UTIs by preventing unnecessary catheterizations.

The BladderScan portable ultrasound instrument, is noninvasive, easy to use and employs patent-pending NeuralHarmonics technology. The company says NeuralHarmonics technology improves both speed and accuracy in bladder volume measurement, and helps achieve previously unattainable differentiation of the bladder, urine and hypo-echogenic regions, such as the uterus, thereby reducing error and minimizing uncertainty in measurements of bladder function.

For more information: www.verathon.com

Related Content

Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S. launch of the SuperSonic MACH 40 ultrasound system, expanding the company’s suite of ultrasound technologies with its first premium, cart-based system.
News | Breast Imaging | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S.
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac
A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Diffusion tractography uses the movement of water molecules to identify tracts that connect different parts of the brain. It can be used to pinpoint the part of the thalamus to treat with focused ultrasound. Image courtesy of UT Southwestern Medical Center

Diffusion tractography uses the movement of water molecules to identify tracts that connect different parts of the brain. It can be used to pinpoint the part of the thalamus to treat with focused ultrasound. Image courtesy of UT Southwestern Medical Center

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 15, 2020
June 15, 2020 — Recently developed magneti...