News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 05, 2020

Ultrasound Systems Market to Outpace Other Imaging Modalities for COVID-19 Diagnostics

Although it is likely that existing ultrasound systems will be repurposed to treat COVID-19 patients, growth is still expected as companies plan to ramp up production. The ultrasound systems market will therefore outpace other diagnostic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Leading data and analytics company GlobalData forecasts the market will reach $6bn by 2028, but increased usage due to COVID-19 is anticipated have a tangible effect.

June 5, 2020 — Although it is likely that existing ultrasound systems will be repurposed to treat COVID-19 patients, growth is still expected as companies plan to ramp up production. The ultrasound systems market will therefore outpace other diagnostic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Leading data and analytics company GlobalData forecasts the market will reach $6bn by 2028, but increased usage due to COVID-19 is anticipated have a tangible effect.

Aliyah Farouk, Medical Device Analyst at GlobalData, comments: “Over half of the current COVID-19 clinical trials in diagnostic imaging investigate the effectiveness of lung ultrasounds with many showing promise. The use of handheld and portable ultrasound solutions is especially valuable for treating COVID-19 patients due to the portability and ease of sterilization. Additionally, usage is safe for children and pregnant women as exposure to radiation is eliminated with no reduction in diagnostic accuracy.”

These advantages coupled with saved timed and reduced costs makes the modality an attractive choice for many hospitals. GlobalData thereby expects ultrasound systems will be the first imaging modality of choice.

Farouk concludes: “Overall the diagnostic imaging market is recovering as many regions have begun to reintroduce imaging services. GE Healthcare reported plunging global scan volumes for CT and MRI in March but there was a significant turnaround by May. GlobalData expects this sector to fully recover by the end of the year as healthcare institutions make up for lost or delayed procedures.”

For more information: www.globaldata.com

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