News | October 31, 2011

Toshiba Introduces the Industry’s Only 16-Channel MR Flex Coils

October 31, 2011 – To ensure MR imaging is as efficient and safe as possible, Toshiba America Medical Systems has unveiled enhancements to its Vantage Titan MR (magnetic resonance) product line, including the first high-density 16-channel flexible coil system (works-in-progress). The new additions to the Vantage Titan MR systems are designed to make it easier for clinicians to complete high-quality exams and improve diagnostic efficiency.

With availability targeted for the Vantage Titan 1.5T and 3.0T systems, the 16-channel flexible coil system conforms closer to the anatomy, improving signal-to-noise ratio for more accurate images. The flexible coils are planned to be available in small, medium and large sizes, and are ideally suited for pediatrics and general musculoskeletal applications. For pediatrics, where standard coils are often too large, the small and flexible coils can fit to nearly any body part, including the head, spine and extremities.

Other enhancements include M-Power, a customizable user interface allowing technologists to streamline scanning processes and enhance diagnostic efficiencies. M-Power has an easy upgrade path for those systems already installed, and is available on Toshiba’s Vantage Atlas and Vantage Titan 1.5T and 3.0T MR systems. Non-contrast CSF Flow Visualization is also available for M-Power equipped systems. This new application of Toshiba’s advanced Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse (Time-SLIP) non-contrast technique enables clinicians to evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow disorders.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

 

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