News | Teleradiology | March 18, 2020

TeleRay Telemedicine Solution Can Be Implemented in a Single Day

Nautilus Medical, Inc announced the immediate availability of TeleRay, its complete telemedicine solution in compliance with the Telehealth Services During Certain Emergency Periods Act of 2020

March 18, 2020 — Nautilus Medical, Inc announced the immediate availability of TeleRay, its complete telemedicine solution in compliance with the Telehealth Services During Certain Emergency Periods Act of 2020 for the treatment of patients during the Coronavirus / Covid-19 outbreak.

Telemedicine – the ability of a clinician to interact, diagnose and advise patients remotely over an audio/video feed – is a vital tool in the management of pandemic conditions. It reduces the exposure of at-risk clinical staff to infection and, in the unfortunate event they need to self-quarantine, allows clinicians to continue to practice from confinement. Further, the use of telemedicine eliminates patient exposure to cross-infection when visiting a healthcare facility. Evidence of this is clear by comparing the morbidity and mortality rates of the Coronavirus outbreak prior to its being identified in Wuhan, China (5.1 percent) and after aggressive social distancing and quarantine rules were imposed once the outbreak was understood (0.7 percent). The US mortality rate for this condition is currently above 3 percent.

Under the State of Emergency announced by President Trump recently, significant resources have been made available by the U.S. government to fund such consultations. Telehealth coverage included in the Coronavirus Spending Bill allows full reimbursement from Medicare and waives geographical restrictions on telehealth allowing care to be received at patients' homes. However, while widely used, telemedicine is still unavailable in many care sites and implementation can be expensive, burdensome and time consuming at a time when it is most needed. CEO Tim Kelley noted "Many of our professional users already suffer from physician burnout and this crisis will add to the stress. Telehealth is a method to reduce stress and exposure."

TeleRay telemedicine is a totally elastic, HIPAA-compliant platform which allows for immediate implementation and on-boarding of patients. Unlike many other solutions, there is no requirement for changes to a practice's existing systems such as scheduling and electronic medical records, while TeleRay's split payment capability allows for accurate and simple billing. Nautilus provides free technical support for implementation and reimbursement advice.

CTO Cody Neville commented, "We are receiving many requests for a fast solution which can be scaled quickly and economically. TeleRay can be implemented with no up-front cost and nominal call charges per consultation, which delivers much needed relief at a particularly difficult time for US health providers and their patients."

More information: www.TeleRay.io

Related Content

For years telehealth has danced at the edges of healthcare
Feature | Teleradiology | January 21, 2021 | By Jef Williams
All indications point to 2021 being the year of the return path of this boomerang event that sent us all in a differe
The key trends Clinicians reviewing a COVID-19 patient's lung CT that reveals the severity of COVID-caused pneumonia. The impact of COVID on radiology was a major, over arching trend at  the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. Getty Imagesbserved at 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting all focused around COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) and the impact it has had on radiology. #RSNA #RSNA20 #RSNA2020

Clinicians reviewing a COVID-19 patient's lung CT that reveals the severity of COVID-caused pneumonia. The impact of COVID on radiology was a major, over arching trend at  the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. Getty Images

Feature | RSNA | January 20, 2021 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane and Dave Fornell
An interview with Eric Liederman, M.D., MPH, Director of Medical Informatics for The Permanente Medical Group, in Kaiser Permanente’s Northern California Region, on the explosion of telemedicine in the COVID-19 era

Getty Images

Feature | Radiology Business | January 20, 2021 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
More complex, longer interventional procedures such as structural heart interventions or this revascularization of a coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, requires angiography imaging systems that have improved image detail and lower radiation dose. However, purchase of new systems was put on hold by many hospitals in 2020 due to the sudden drop in elective procedures and diversion of resources due to the COVID-19. Photo by Dave Fornell.

More complex, longer interventional procedures such as structural heart interventions or this revascularization of a coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, requires angiography imaging systems that have improved image detail and lower radiation dose. However, purchase of new systems was put on hold by many hospitals in 2020 due to the sudden drop in elective procedures and diversion of resources due to the COVID-19. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Angiography | January 19, 2021 | By Bhvita Jani
January 19, 2021 – With the postponement of non-essential elective surgeries and medical procedures in 2020 to conser
Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 Transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient. Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH

Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 Transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient. Image captured and color-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Image courtesy of  National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | January 15, 2021
January 15, 2021 — In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the...
Use of telehealth jumped sharply during the first months of the coronavirus pandemic shutdown, with the approach being used more often for behavioral health services than for medical care, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Getty Images

News | Teleradiology | January 13, 2021
January 13, 2021 — Use of telehealth jumped sha
Myocarditis among recovering COVID-19 athletes less common than previously reported

Getty Images

News | Cardiac Imaging | January 11, 2021
January 11, 2021 — In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's...
The FDA is monitoring the potential impact of viral mutations, including an emerging variant from the United Kingdom known as the B.1.1.7 variant, on authorized SARS-CoV-2 molecular tests

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | January 08, 2021
January 8, 2021 — The U.S.
In this roundtable discussion hosted by ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane, three medical experts will discuss the impact COVID-19 had on the industry in 2020, as well as projections for the industry in 2021.
Webinar | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | January 06, 2021
2020 was an unprecedented year, as the world grappled with a...
Who should get the COVID vaccine? Roberto Lang, M.D., director of noninvasive cardiac imaging, University of Chicago Medical Center and former American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) president, received his first dose of the COVID vaccine in December. In addition to front line hospital workers, nursing home staff and residents also qualified for the first round of vaccinations. Right, Shannon Yaw, a nurse at a hard-hit nursing home in Michigan, received her first dose just before Christmas.

Roberto Lang, M.D., director of noninvasive cardiac imaging, University of Chicago Medical Center and former American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) president, received his first dose of the COVID vaccine in December. In addition to front line hospital workers, nursing home staff and residents also qualified for the first round of vaccinations. Right, Shannon Yaw, OTR/L, director of rehabilitation at a hard-hit nursing home in Michigan, received her first dose just before Christmas. nurse at a hard-hit nursing home in Michigan, received her first dose just before Christmas.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | January 04, 2021
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Dec.