News | February 06, 2012

Surgical Breast Biopsy Not Overused, Says Study

 Breast Biopsy needles

February 6, 2012 — Contrary to earlier findings, surgical breast biopsies may not be as overused as previously thought according to a study in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Surgical breast biopsies are more invasive than needle biopsies, requiring an incision and the use of general anesthesia.

Results from a previous study in 2011 in a surgical journal suggested that surgery is used for 30 percent of breast biopsies — an excessive number. However, the authors of the JACR article thought that the reported results overstated the percentage of biopsies performed as surgical biopsies. As a result, they sought to more accurately assess the use of needle biopsy compared with surgical biopsy.

The nationwide Medicare Part B databases for 2004 to 2009 were used during the study. Trends in use of codes for five different types of breast biopsies, including needle biopsy with imaging, needle biopsy without imaging and surgical biopsy were determined.

Using a more appropriate analysis of the biopsy codes, Medicare data indicated that the true surgical breast biopsy figure is somewhere between 2 and 18 percent, and probably close to 11 percent. 

“In the Medicare population nationwide, it seems the use of surgical biopsy is substantially less than the 30 percent previously alleged,” said David C. Levin, M.D., lead author of the study. 

“Given that the recommended rate is 10 percent, it seems that surgeons and radiologists are collaborating well and that surgical breast biopsy is not being overused,” said Levin.

For more information: www.jacr.org

Related Content

Explaining the Mammography Quality Standards Act
Feature | Mammography | October 16, 2018
The Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) was enacted to improve the quality of mammography and ensure that all...
CT Offers Non-Invasive Alternative for Complex Coronary Disease Treatment Planning
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | October 16, 2018
A new study published in the European Heart Journal shows computed tomography (CT) can be a useful aid in heart team...

Images from computed tomography (CT) colonography show segmented abdominal aortic calcification measured with semiautomated CT tool on coronal image. Within region of interest over aorta selected by user, tool automatically segments and quantifies aortic calcification (shown in blue). 

Image Credit: O’Connor S D, Graffy P M, Zea R, et al. Does nonenhanced CT-based quantification of abdominal aortic calcification outperform the Framingham Risk Score in predicting cardiovascular event sin asymptomatic adults? Radiology doi: 10.1148/radiol.2018180562. Published online Oct. 2, 2018. © RSNA.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 12, 2018
Computed tomography (CT)-based measures of calcification in the abdominal aorta are strong predictors of heart attacks...
iCAD Announces Positive Clinical Results for Artificial Intelligence Tomosynthesis Technology
News | Mammography | October 11, 2018
iCAD Inc. announced positive clinical results of its new digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) cancer detection software,...
"Where's My Mammogram?" Campaign Helps Women Own Breast Health Records
News | Breast Imaging | October 10, 2018
October 10, 2018 — Mammosphere launched “Where’s My Mammogram?,” a public service campaign to help women obtain copie
DenseBreast-info.org Launches European Expansion
News | Breast Density | October 10, 2018
DenseBreast-info.org (DB-I) announced the launch of its international expansion for European medical providers. The...
Surgery, Radiation Therapy Equally Effective in Treating Oropharyngeal Cancer
News | Radiation Therapy | October 09, 2018
A new study by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center found no major long-term differences in the effectiveness...
X-ray Mammography Adoption to Skyrocket for Breast Cancer Detection
News | Mammography | October 08, 2018
Highly populated countries have traditionally been slow adopters of non-conventional business models, but a new Frost...
Cullman Regional Medical Center

Cullman Regional Medical Center (Alabama) is a 145-bed medical center serving more than 175,000 residents in a six-county area and recognized as one of the region’s finest medical facilities.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | PACS | October 05, 2018
When Cullman Regional Medical Center in Alabama decided to switch from 2-D