News | Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) | July 05, 2017

Surgery and High-Dose SBRT Radiation Can Be Combined to Treat Kidney Cancer

First clinical study to show benefit of surgery following SBRT, and to demonstrate that SBRT stimulates immune system

Surgery and High-Dose SBRT Radiation Can Be Combined to Treat Kidney Cancer

July 5, 2017 — A new study from Roswell Park Cancer Institute reporting the findings of the first clinical trial to evaluate the immune effects of high-dose radiation therapy followed by surgery in patients with advanced kidney cancer may also set the stage for combination treatments with immunotherapy. The research, published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), shows that nephrectomy can be effectively paired with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), and also provides strong evidence that immunotherapy may be an effective third element to incorporate into this combination therapy strategy.

In a pilot clinical study, 14 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) were treated with SBRT in a single administration (fraction) followed four weeks later by cytoreductive nephrectomy, or surgery to remove or reduce the size of their tumors. The team set out to assess the safety and feasibility of this approach and analyze the immunological impact of high-dose radiation. Based on their preliminary studies in the lab, the team monitored patients’ tumors for expression of immunomodulatory molecules and tumor-associated antigens. 

“We saw a significant increase in calreticulin and other molecules that stimulate T cells,” said the paper’s first author, Anurag Singh, M.D., professor of oncology and director of radiation research with the Department of Radiation Medicine at Roswell Park. “This suggests that it may be possible to improve the effectiveness of immunotherapies by first priming the pump with high-dose radiation.” 

The authors include a contributor from the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Medical University of South Carolina.

Findings from this research will also be presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting, Sept. 24-27 in San Diego, where Singh will receive a Basic/Translational Science Abstract Award for his role in this work.

The research was supported by grants from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (project no. UL1TR001412), National Cancer Institute (project nos. P30CA016056 and R01CA140622), the Sklarow Foundation, Elsa Kreiner Memorial Fund, Fraternal Order of Eagles and RPCI Friends of Urology.

For more information: www.clincancerres.aacrjournals.org

Related Content

Stronger Distribution Networks to Bolster Radiotherapy Patient Positioning Accessories
News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | July 19, 2019
A recent study projects global market revenues for radiotherapy patient positioning accessories will exceed revenues of...
IBM collected a dataset of 52,936 images from 13,234 women who underwent at least one mammogram between 2013 and 2017.

IBM collected a dataset of 52,936 images from 13,234 women who underwent at least one mammogram between 2013 and 2017, and who had health records for at least one year prior to the mammogram. The algorithm was trained on 9,611 mammograms. Image courtesy of Radiology.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | July 19, 2019 | Michal Chorev
Breast cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women, and the most commonly diagnosed cancer...
CMS Proposes New Alternative Payment Model for Radiation Oncology
News | Radiation Oncology | July 17, 2019
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a proposal for an advanced alternative payment model (APM)...
AAPM 2019 Features More Than 40 Presentations on ViewRay's MRIdian MRI-guided Radiotherapy
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 16, 2019
ViewRay Inc. announced that the company's MRIdian System is the focus of more than 40 abstracts selected by the...