News | Ultrasound Women's Health | April 03, 2019

SuperSonic Imagine Highlights Aixplorer Mach 30 Breast Ultrasound at SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium

New features on latest generation system include SWE Plus elastography, SonicPad touchpad

SuperSonic Imagine Highlights Aixplorer Mach 30 Breast Ultrasound at SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium

April 3, 2019 — SuperSonic Imagine will introduce the new generation of its Aixplorer Mach 30 breast ultrasound solution at the 2019 Society of Breast Imaging/American College of Radiology (SBI/ACR) Breast Imaging Symposium, April 4-7 in Hollywood, Fla. The SBI‘s annual symposium is the largest breast imaging conference in the world and this year, the symposium will focus on Value in Breast Imaging. SuperSonic Imagine will highlight new features and better performance with features like SWE Plus and SonicPure.

The advantages of ShearWave Elastography (SWE) in the diagnosis of mammary lesions has been demonstrated in more than 135 articles in peer-reviewed journals, including an international study involving more than 1,600 patients1in the U.S. and Europe, and another study on population with dense breast realized in China in 1,021 women2. SWE improves the diagnostic performance of conventional ultrasonography by enhancing the characterisation and boosting the specificity of mammary lesions. It makes it possible to decrease the number negative biopsies.

The new Aixplorer Mach 30 is equipped with the next generation of ShearWave Plus (SWE Plus) elastography and offers an advanced breast imaging solution with enhanced speed of acquisition.

Both 2-D and 3-D patented SWE Plus offers greater performance of real-time, reliable, quantitative and reproducible evaluation of tissue stiffness and visualisation. SWE Plus provides new information and helps improve the identification of malignant or benign lesions. It offers greater diagnostic precision, which considerably reduces the number of false positives and unnecessary biopsies.

SuperSonic Imagine also offers numerous innovative imaging modes to improve the efficacy of breast examinations and patient comfort. Needle PL.U.S offers increased reliability during procedures guided by ultrasound and biopsies. The application enables physicians to view anatomical structures and biopsy needles simultaneously and predict their trajectory in real time. Angio PL.U.S offers high resolution for imaging microvascularization of lesions. TriVu combines real-time simultaneous imaging of B-mode, ShearWave Plus and Angio PL.U.S. enabling users to visualize the anatomy, function (tissue stiffness) and blood flow on the same image simultaneously.  

Aixplorer Mach 30 features a new concept in ultrasound, according to the company, with its SonicPad touchpad, designed to enhance the user experience. With its intuitive touch screen interface, SonicPad offers intuitive control of all the functions needed to conduct the exam. It allows imagers to focus their attention on analyzing the clinical information displayed on the screen rather than on the controls used to optimise the acquisition of an image.

For more information: www.aixplorer-mach.com

 

References

1. Berg W.A., Zhang Z., Lehrer D., et al. Detection of breast cancer with addition of annual screening ultrasound or a single screening MRI to mammography in women with elevated breast cancer risk. JAMA. 2012 Apr 4;307(13):1394-404.

2. Lee S.H., Chung J., Choi H.Y., et al. Evaluation of Screening US-detected Breast Masses by Combined Use of Elastography and Color Doppler US with B-Mode US in Women with Dense Breasts: A Multicenter Prospective Study. Radiology. 2017 Nov;285(2):660-669.

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