News | Contrast Media | July 05, 2016

Study Finds No Association Between Gadolinium Contrast and Nervous System Disorder

Patients who did not undergo gadolinium-enhanced MRI had same rate of disorder development as those who did

MRI, gadolinium contrast, Parkinsonism, nervous system disorder, Blayne Welk, Western University

July 5, 2016 — A study appearing in the July 5 issue of JAMA assessed the association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination. The study was conducted by Blayne Welk, M.D., M.Sc., of Western University, London, Canada, and colleagues.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents are used for enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Safety concerns have emerged over retained gadolinium in the globus pallidi (an area of the brain). Neurotoxic effects have been seen in animals and when gadolinium is given intrathecally (a type of method for administering a drug) in humans. Consequences of damage to the globus pallidi may include parkinsonian symptoms. For this study, multiple linked administrative databases from Ontario, Canada were used. All patients older than 66 years who underwent an initial MRI between April 2003 and March 2013 were identified. Patients who were exposed to gadolinium-enhanced MRIs were compared with patients who received non-gadolinium-enhanced MRIs.

Of the 246,557 patients undergoing at least one MRI (not of the brain or spine) during the study period, 99,739 (40.5 percent) received at least one dose of gadolinium. Among patients who underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRIs, 81.5 percent underwent a single study, and 2.5 percent underwent 4 or more gadolinium-enhanced studies. Incident parkinsonism developed in 1.2 percent of unexposed patients and 1.2 percent of those exposed to gadolinium. No significant association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism was found.

“This result does not support the hypothesis that gadolinium deposits in the globus pallidi lead to neuronal damage manifesting as parkinsonism. However, reports of other nonspecific symptoms (pain, cognitive changes) after gadolinium exposure require further study,” the authors wrote.

 

Related Gadolinium Safety Concern Articles

Gadolinium May Remain in Brain after Contrast MRI

MRIs During Pregnancy Are Safe, But Gadolinium Scans May Increase Risk to Fetus

ACR Manual on Contrast Media Addresses FDA Gadolinium Safety Concerns

Even High Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Doesn't Cause NSF

 

For more information: www.jama.jamanetwork.com

Related Content

FDA Clears First Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Device
Technology | Pediatric Imaging | July 21, 2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device specifically...
Electronic Brachytherapy Comparable to Mohs Surgery in Early-Stage Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Treatment
News | Brachytherapy Systems | July 20, 2017
July 20, 2017 — Rates of recurrence in early-stage non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) patients were virtually identical
3-D Vascular Ultrasound Quantifies Plaque Burden to Estimate Cardiovascular Risk
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 20, 2017
In a large, first-of-its-kind population, researchers found an experimental technique known as three-dimensional...
Guerbet Announces Plans to Streamline Contrast Media Portfolio, gadolinium MRI contrast
News | Contrast Media | July 18, 2017
July 18, 2017 — Guerbet recently announced that it will phase out sales throughout the world of two products: Hexabri
Synergy Radiology Associates Employs UroNav Fusion Biopsy System for Better Prostate Cancer Diagnosis
News | Biopsy Systems | July 17, 2017
Radiologists from Synergy Radiology Associates (SRA) in Houston are using the power of 3-D medical imaging and...
Low Doses of Radiation Could Harm Cardiovascular Health
News | Radiation Dose Management | July 17, 2017
Ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, has a harmful effect on the cardiovascular system even at doses equivalent to...
ACR Offers Revised Contrast Media in Imaging Manual
News | Contrast Media | July 17, 2017
The American College of Radiology (ACR) recently revised its authoritative guide for the safe and effective use of...
PET/CT Tracer Identifies Vulnerable Lesions in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Example of a patient with an upper left lung NSCLC: A: FDG; B: FDG PET/CT; C: Planning radiotherapy based on FDG (66Gy) with BTVm (GTV), CTV and PTV; D: PET FMISO E: FMISO PET/CT; F: boost based on the FMISO PET (76Gy) with BTVh (biological hypoxic target volume) and PTV boost. Credit: QuantIF – LITIS EA 4108 – FR CNRS 3638, Henri Becquerel Cancer Center, Rouen, France

News | PET-CT | July 14, 2017
July 14, 2017 — Fluorine-18 (18F)-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) is a positron emission tomography (PET)...
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 13, 2017
Elekta and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre have initiated installation of Elekta’s MR-linac, an investigational...
Insurance Coverage for CT Colonography Increases Likelihood of Screening
News | Colonoscopy Systems | July 12, 2017
People with insurance policies that cover computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening are...
Overlay Init