News | Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) | May 03, 2017

Stereotactic Radiation Highly Effective for Kidney Cancer

UT Southwestern study finds stereotactic radiation achieves more than 90 percent control of metastases, offering noninvasive alternative to conventional treatment with fewer side effects

Stereotactic Radiation Highly Effective for Kidney Cancer

May 3, 2017 — Kidney cancer patients may soon have an alternative to traditional treatments, according to new research at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Kidney Cancer Program of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Their recent study showed that treating metastatic kidney cancer with an advanced, focused form of radiation called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy achieves more than 90 percent control of metastases.

“This study shows that stereotactic radiation provides a good noninvasive alternative to conventional treatment, and that it effectively controls the disease,” said Raquibul Hannan, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiation oncology, co-leader of the Kidney Cancer Program and senior author of the study. “It may also offer an alternative to patients who are not candidates for surgery due to the number and location of the metastases.”

The standard of care for metastatic renal cell carcinoma is systemic therapy, such as targeted drugs or immunotherapy, which often has significant side effects like fatigue, high blood pressure and rash. According to Hannan, the new study shows that some of these patients can be treated with stereotactic radiation therapy with the goal of being cured, or to delay systemic therapy, allowing patients to enjoy a better quality of life without the side effects of the drugs.

“This study, which represents, possibly, the largest experience reported in the medical literature, may also help medical oncologists, since stereotactic radiation could be used for patients who have limited sites of progression while receiving systemic therapy,” said James Brugarolas, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine and leader of the Kidney Cancer Program.

The study is published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, and Physics.

The research was conducted in the Kidney Cancer Program, one of two programs in the country to be recognized with an $11 million SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) from the National Cancer Institute. As part of the SPORE, researchers are improving the ways in which radiation is given by evaluating combinations with drugs and identifying those tumors that are most likely to respond. In particular, investigators are evaluating combinations with immunotherapy, iSABR – immunotherapy and stereotatic ablative radiation therapy.

Nearly 400,000 Americans are now living with a diagnosis of kidney cancer and more than 60,000 people are expected to be diagnosed with kidney cancer this year, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Five-year survival rate averages run from 81 percent for stage 1, when cancer is contained in the kidney, to about 53 percent for stage 3, when it has spread beyond the kidney, and just 8 percent for stage 4, when the cancer spreads to more distant parts of the body or other organs. However, for stage four patients, 5-year survival rates at the UT Southwestern’s Kidney Cancer Program are double national benchmarks.

For more information: www.redjournal.org

Related Content

Amar Kishan, M.D.

Amar Kishan, M.D.

News | Prostate Cancer | September 11, 2018
UCLA researchers have discovered that a combination of high doses of...
Videos | Radiation Therapy | September 07, 2018
A discussion with Ehsan Samei, Ph.D., DABR, FAAPM, FSPIE, director of the Duke University Clinical Imaging Physics Gr
Boston Scientific to Acquire Augmenix Inc.
News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | September 07, 2018
Boston Scientific has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Augmenix Inc., a privately-held company which has...
PET Imaging Agent Predicts Brain Tau Pathology, Alzheimer's Diagnosis
News | PET Imaging | September 05, 2018
Eli Lilly and Co. and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc. announced a Phase 3 study of positron emission tomography (PET)...
Check-Cap Announces Interim Results of European Study of C-Scan System Version 3
News | Colonoscopy Systems | September 04, 2018
Check-Cap Ltd. announced the interim results for its post-CE approval study of the C-Scan system Version 3, an...
Brain Iron Levels May Predict Multiple Sclerosis Disabilities
News | Neuro Imaging | August 31, 2018
A new, highly accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple...
Study Finds Multiple Sclerosis Drug Slows Brain Shrinkage

An NIH-funded clinical trial suggested that the anti-inflammatory drug ibudilast may slow brain shrinkage caused by progressive MS. Image courtesy of Robert J. Fox, M.D., Cleveland Clinic.

News | Neuro Imaging | August 30, 2018
August 30, 2018 — Results from a clinical...
Non-Canonical Strategy May Improve Cancer Radiotherapy
News | Radiation Therapy | August 29, 2018
August 29, 2018 — Although the success or failure of...
Rapid Cardiac MRI Technique May Cut Costs, Boost Care in Developing World
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 29, 2018
A newly developed rapid imaging protocol quickly and cheaply diagnosed heart ailments in patients in Peru, according to...
Videos | Treatment Planning | August 28, 2018
A discussion with...
Overlay Init