News | November 14, 2007

St. Joseph Health System Selects Microsoft’s Azyxxi to Optimize Treatment Decisions

November 15, 2007 – The California-based St. Joseph Health System selected Azyxxi, the Microsoft unified health enterprise platform, making it the largest community-based hospital network to adopt the platform to date.

The company says Azyxxi offers a new way to capture, store and present information, enabling healthcare systems to unlock data sitting in clinical, financial and administrative silos across organizations. As a result, caregivers can spend less time looking for information and more time providing quality care to patients.

Accessible on computers, tablet PCs and handheld devices, Azyxxi provides real-time responses to clinical, administrative and research-specific questions. Equipped with decision-support tools, the platform can also help physicians determine the best treatment options. Dr. Clyde Wesp, chief medical information officer for St. Joseph Health System, said Azyxxi is one of the primary pillars in the hospital network’s initiative to leverage technological advancements to improve the quality of patient care.

“Azyxxi is an indispensable tool that will take our existing systems to the next level and keep St. Joseph Health System on the forefront of information technology, delivering the best possible care to the communities we serve,” Wesp said. “With Azyxxi, all our physicians - those in the hospitals, community-based and in group practices - will have virtually instant access to a patient's health information, thereby increasing connectivity between providers and improving care for patients.”

Initial installation of Azyxxi will begin early in 2008 and take place across all 14 acute-care hospitals, three home-health agencies and multiple physician groups throughout St. Joseph’s three regions -northern California, southern California, west Texas, and eastern New Mexico. A more robust installation of Azyxxi will take place at two hospitals, with a full rollout across the health system by the end of 2009.

For more information: www.microsoft.com

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