Technology | Radiology Imaging | June 30, 2015

Spellman High Voltage Electronics Introduces Z Series Radiography Generators

Compact series offers high performance for space-constrained applications

Spellman, Z Series, X-ray generators, digital radiography, DR

June 30, 2015 - Spellman High Voltage announces the introduction of its new Z Series X-Ray generator for radiographic applications. Featuring 450 kHz maximum output frequency, the generators provide high voltage accuracy and stability in a compact package for space-constrained applications.

The Z Series generators are offered with various options including dual speed starter, dual filament drive and a variety of control console choices. Generators are available from 32kW to 65kW peak power, 40kV – 150kV output voltage, and up to five different manual and AEC operating modes.  The Z series platform is an ideal OEM generator solution for value to mid-tier medical radiography segments.

The compact size of the series (595mm L x 410mm W x 475mm H) and its flexible interface makes the Z Series easy to integrate, install, calibrate and service. This is accomplished through the use of Windows-based service graphical user interface (GUI) software, serial communication port, automatic X-ray tube calibration, expandable X-ray tube library, Bucky/digital radiography (DR) interface and optional AEC and DAP interface. 

The Z-Series complements Spellman's Editor HFE series radiographic/fluoroscopic generator for advanced applications across mid and high-end segments.

For more information: www.spellmanhv.com

Related Content

Videos | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019
Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medica
Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System
Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019
Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug...
The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.

The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July. 

Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr
Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay

Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay

Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy.
Samsung Announces New iQuia Premium Digital Radiography Platform
Technology | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 25, 2019
Samsung has announced iQuia, a new digital radiography (DR) platform of premium products and technologies that improves...
Konica Minolta and Shimadzu to Co-market Dynamic Digital Radiography in the U.S.
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 23, 2019
Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. along with Shimadzu Medical Systems USA announced a collaborative agreement to...
Body language expert Traci Brown spoke at the AHRA 2019 meeting on how to identify when a person is not being honest by their body language. She said medical imaging department administrators can use this knowledge to help in hiring decisions and managing staff.

Body language expert Traci Brown spoke at the AHRA 2019 meeting on how to identify when a person is not being honest by their body language. She said medical imaging department administrators can use this knowledge to help in hiring decisions and managing staff. 

Feature | Radiology Business | July 23, 2019 | Greg Freiherr
Can you tell when someone is lying?