News | Breast Imaging | January 15, 2021

Solis Mammography Announces the Acquisition of Progressive Radiology

Progressive Radiology is a leading provider of outpatient medical imaging services in the greater DC metropolitan area

Solis Mammography, the nation’s largest independent provider of breast health and diagnostic services, announced that it has expanded its state-of-the-art multimodality medical imaging capabilities in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC through the acquisition of Progressive Radiology.

January 15, 2021 — Solis Mammography, the nation’s largest independent provider of breast health and diagnostic services, announced that it has expanded its state-of-the-art multimodality medical imaging capabilities in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC through the acquisition of Progressive Radiology.

Progressive Radiology joins Solis Mammography’s Washington Radiology, another leading medical imaging provider in the DC metropolitan area, in the stable of Solis Mammography’s innovative radiology companies who share a mission of providing the highest quality imaging care with a high-touch patient-centric experience.

“With the addition of Progressive Radiology to the Solis Mammography and Washington Radiology family, we are now able to expand our geographic footprint for outpatient imaging in the DMV region,” said Grant Davies, president and Chief Executive Officer of Solis Mammography. “For more than 45 years, Progressive Radiology has provided advanced diagnostic imaging services to patients and medical providers with their team of board-certified, subspecialized radiologists, many of whom are nationally recognized clinicians and educators. By acquiring Progressive Radiology, we are amplifying our dedication to serving patients with the highest quality of care available.”

“Washington Radiology has built a reputation for being the first to market for technical innovation and clinical leadership, particularly in breast health and women’s imaging, and has a 70-year history of excellence,” he continued. “Progressive Radiology has equally contributed to the changing healthcare landscape with a robust musculoskeletal and sports imaging platform, as well as a specialized focus on neuroradiology and pediatric imaging. Together, we will remain mutually dedicated to delivering an exceptional experience to the women, men and children that we serve, while growing services across the region.”

“I’m looking forward to continuing our tradition of providing an incomparable level of service to our patients and the medical community,” said Adam Starr, CEO of Progressive Radiology. “Our existing radiology team of skilled physicians and technologists will continue to serve our patients and provide the focused expertise the clinical community has come to rely on. And, with Solis’ innovation engine, I’m also looking forward to what the future holds.”

With the acquisition of Progressive Radiology, the combined organization will expand its footprint to 17 imaging center locations with additional growth on the horizon.

For more information: www.solismammo.com

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