News | November 07, 2011

SNM Launches Web Site for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Patients

November 7, 2011 – The Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) launched a new patient-focused website, discoverMI.org, to provide patients with information about nuclear medicine and molecular imaging and how it can play a critical role in the detection, treatment and management of diseases.

“Many times patients referred for a nuclear medicine or molecular imaging studies are nervous about what to expect,” said George Segall, M.D., SNM president. “By providing information and explaining the benefits of the study in an easy-to-understand format, we can offer them both help and support.”

The website focuses on three common disease areas: heart disease, cancer and brain disease. For each area, specific types of disease are detailed along with the various nuclear and molecular imaging procedures that are associated with each. General information on molecular imaging, an extensive glossary and a video library are also included on the site. Additionally, patients can stay up to date on the latest in molecular imaging news through Facebook and Twitter pages designed to complement the site.

DiscoverMI.org is supported by several patient advocacy groups that are a part of SNM’s Patient Advocacy Advisory Board (PAAB), including the Alzheimer’s Association, the American Thyroid Association, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, the Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Arizona, the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, the American Heart Association, the Men’s Health Network and the Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association.

“I am thrilled that this comprehensive resource for patients is now available,” said Betsy de Parry, a member of SNM’s PAAB and author of Adventures in Cancer Land. Laurel Pracht, SNM PAAB member and patient advocate for the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, added, “As a patient, it is critical to have access to user-friendly information about what is available for someone with your disease. The website provides information about both what is currently available in molecular imaging and how it may affect you.”

More than 16 million Americans undergo nuclear and molecular imaging and therapy procedures each year for a variety of conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological conditions and other physiological problems. Nuclear and molecular imaging procedures are an invaluable way to gather medical information that would otherwise be unavailable, require surgery or necessitate more expensive diagnostic tests.

For more information: www.snm.org

 

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