News | February 28, 2014

Skin Reactions During Radiation Therapy Preventable

February 28, 2014 — Severe skin reactions during radiation therapy could be prevented by applying a thin transparent silicone dressing to the skin from the first day of treatment, clinical research from New Zealand shows.

Although many skincare products have been tested in clinical trials over the years, until now none have been able to completely prevent severe skin reactions, said senior lecturer Patries Herst of University of Otago Wellington's department of radiation therapy.

Herst and her team of radiation therapists, oncology nurses and medical physicists have completed five randomized controlled clinical trials in public hospitals in Dunedin, Wellington, Palmerston North and Auckland Radiation Oncology over the past five years, all focusing on side effects caused by radiation therapy.

Their most recent trial was in collaboration with Dunedin Hospital, and demonstrated it is possible to prevent skin reactions from developing in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

Skin reactions are common in these patients, ranging from mild redness to ulceration with symptoms of pain, burning and itchiness, Herst said.

The dressings work by adhering closely to the small folds in the skin without the use of adhesives, so do not stick to open wounds. By protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction against items of clothing or other parts of the body, they allow the stem cells of the skin to heal from the radiation damage in an undisturbed environment. The dressings are also free of chemicals that could react with the skin.

Herst is currently setting up a trial that will test the dressings in head and neck cancer patients.

The results have been published online in Radiotherapy and Oncology.

For more information: www.journals.elsevier.com/radiotherapy-and-oncology

Related Content

Insightec Announces Expanded Reach of MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound
News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | August 22, 2017
Insightec announced recently that worldwide adoption of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided focused ultrasound continues to...
UCLA Study Offers Roadmap to Personalized Therapies for Sarcoma
News | Oncology Diagnostics | August 22, 2017
A new UCLA study is the first to identify patient and tumor characteristics that predict the successful creation of...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Information Technology | August 22, 2017
Melissa Martin, MS, president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), discusses her vision of t
Comparison of Screening Recommendations Supports Annual Mammography
News | Mammography | August 22, 2017
When to initiate screening for breast cancer, how often to screen, and how long to screen are questions that continue...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Proton Therapy | August 21, 2017
Mark Pankuch, Ph.D., director of medical physics at the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center, discusses the cl
Summit Cancer Center-Boise Treats First Cancer Patients With Accuray Radixact System
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | August 21, 2017
Accuray Inc. and the Summit Cancer Center-Boise announced that the center is now treating patients with the Radixact...
MedStar Georgetown Proton Center Selects RayStation for Treatment Planning
News | Treatment Planning | August 17, 2017
August 17, 2017 — The proton center at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital will utilize RayStation for planning on
DOSIsoft Releases ISOgray Proton Therapy Treatment Planning System
Technology | Treatment Planning | August 15, 2017
DOSIsoft SA announced the official release, with CE marking, of ISOgray Treatment Planning System (TPS) release 4.3 for...
First Radixact Results Presented at AAPM 2017
News | Radiation Therapy | August 10, 2017
Accuray Inc. announced that the first studies validating the benefits of the Radixact System were presented at the 59th...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
Overlay Init