Technology | SPECT-CT | October 18, 2016

Siemens Debuts Expanded xSPECT Quant Technology at RSNA 2016

Software now allows users of Siemens’ Symbit Intevo SPECT/CT system to perform automated, reproducible quantification of Iodine-123, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 exams

Siemens Healthineers, Symbia Intevo SPECT/CT system, xSPECT Quant, RSNA 2016

October 18, 2016 — At the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2016), Siemens Healthineers will showcase an expanded version of xSPECT Quant, its established single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification technology. xSPECT Quant enables users of the company’s Symbia Intevo SPECT/CT system to perform automated, accurate and reproducible quantification of not just Technetium-99m — the most common isotope in SPECT imaging — but also, for the first time, Iodine-123, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111. This extends the use of advanced SPECT quantification from general nuclear medicine and bone studies to indications including neurological disorders, neuroendocrine tumors, neuroblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer.

For more information: www.healthcare.siemens.com

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