Technology | June 22, 2015

ScanMed Introduces Non-Invasive Procure Prostate/Pelvic MRI Coil for Diagnosing Prostate Cancer

Device offers higher image quality, reducing high rates of false positives

ScanMed, ProCure, prostate/pelvic MRI coil, prostate cancer

June 22, 2015 - ScanMed announced the introduction of the non-invasive, wearable ProCure prostate/pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil to aid in diagnosing prostate cancer

According to the National Cancer Institute, prostate cancer is the most common cancer (1 of 6 men) inflicting men in the United States, after skin cancer. It is the second leading cause of death from cancer in men.

Men with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) will often get a blind biopsy and are given a clean ill of health, even though such biopsies are reported to yield between 50 and 90 percent false negatives, meaning that the man did have cancer and it went undetected. After a cancer is left to grow for too long, then options are very few in terms of treatment - either complete removal of the prostate (prostatectomy) or thermal ablation of the entire organ.

The ProCure coil was born from evaluation of the current MRI tools available - non-dedicated antennae and endo-rectal coils that produced inadequate image quality or great reluctance or refusal of use, respectively. ProCure is a dedicated, diaper-like MRI coil which positions multiple antennae elements as close as possible to the target anatomies (the prostate and reproductive organs) regardless of patient size. The coil also allows for biopsy should a radiologist deem that a detected lesion warrants laboratory validation.

For more information: www.scanmed.com

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