News | September 21, 2008

SAVI Applicator Shows Excellent Results in Breast Cancer Patients

September 22, 2008 - A new study of breast cancer radiation treatment performed at 21st Century Oncology has found that Cianna Medical's SAVI applicator delivered excellent cosmetic results with minimal side effects, for women who had not qualified for breast conservation therapy using a previously available balloon device, according to the study.

Reporting on 12 recent cases, the 21st Century Oncology study found no incidence of potential side effects such as seroma (fluid collection), pigmentation change, fibrosis (scar tissue) or infection. Indicating the precision of the SAVI applicator, the maximum skin dose of radiation for patients never exceeded the prescribed amount. In 92 percent of the cases, the cosmetic result was rated “excellent.”

The research team was led by Constantine Mantz, M.D., of 21st Century Oncology, one of the first medical organizations in the nation to offer this new and improved approach in breast brachytherapy, a radiation treatment that is delivered from inside the breast.

The study will be presented as a scientific poster ASTRO 2008.

Breast conservation therapy includes lumpectomy – the surgical removal of the cancerous tissue within the breast plus a small margin of normal tissue immediately surrounding the tumor – followed by radiation. SAVI is a single-entry, multi-catheter device that allows the physician to customize the radiation dose depending on the patient’s anatomy and precise configuration of the surgical site.

“Our study demonstrated that SAVI provides a well-tolerated therapy for patients who otherwise would not be able to safely undergo treatment with the previously available balloon device,” said Dr. Mantz. “SAVI offers the physician multiple catheters for radioactive source loading and therefore total control over radiation dose distribution.”

Explaining the advantages for both physicians and patients, Dr. Mantz said, “I can lightly load catheters near the skin or lung to limit exposure of these sensitive structures. Also, I can heavily load catheters deep within breast tissue, to increase the radiation dose to places where the patient is at risk for harboring microscopic disease. We are very pleased with our clinical outcomes to date with SAVI.”

Prior to doing the study, Dr. Mantz and his research team believed that the multi-catheter applicator’s design might offer a preferable alternative for patients whose tumor cavities were too close to the skin for treatment with the previously available balloon method. Patients whose tumor cavities are within 7 mm of the chest wall or skin surface are often disqualified for treatment with the balloon device because of a potentially severe lung or skin reaction to the radiation.

This study tested the hypothesis by using the SAVI device to treat 12 patients who were found to have less than 7 mm skin-to-cavity spacing. None of the patients suffered a serious skin reaction to the treatment.

The device requires very little spacing between the cavity and healthy tissue, versus other brachytherapy devices that require several millimeters. Accordingly, SAVI expands the number of women eligible for brachytherapy, compared to balloon devices.

The SAVI applicator is a recent advance in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). This shortened course of high-dose radiation therapy is designed for early-stage breast cancer patients following lumpectomy surgery. Breast brachytherapy is a type of APBI in which radiation is delivered from within the breast. APBI reduces treatment time from six or seven weeks – which is generally required with conventional external beam, whole-breast irradiation – to just five days.

For more information: www.ciannamedical.com, www.21stCenturyOncology.com

Related Content

Proton Therapy Lowers Risk of Side Effects Compared to Conventional Radiation
News | Proton Therapy | May 23, 2019
Cancer patients getting proton therapy instead of traditional photon radiation are at a significantly lower risk of...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Varian Acquiring Cancer Treatment Services International
News | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
Varian Medical Systems announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire India’s Cancer Treatment...
Videos | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
This is a walk through of the ViewRay MRIdian MRI-guided radiotherapy system installed at ...
Partial Breast Irradiation Effective, Convenient Treatment Option for Low-Risk Breast Cancer
News | Radiation Therapy | May 20, 2019
Partial breast irradiation produces similar long-term survival rates and risk for recurrence compared with whole breast...
New Method Improves Ability to Measure and Maximize Radiation Therapy Dose
News | Radiation Therapy | May 14, 2019
Delivering just the right dose of radiation for cancer patients is a delicate balance in their treatment regime....
Sponsored Content | Videos | Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019
At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-fi
Radiotherapy After Chemo May Improve Survival in Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients
News | Radiation Therapy | May 10, 2019
Patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma who have large tumors at the time of diagnosis may benefit from radiotherapy...
IBA Partnering to Develop Advanced Digital Proton Therapy Technologies in Belgium
News | Proton Therapy | May 10, 2019
IBA (Ion Beam Applications SA) announced a research agreement with Skandionkliniken, Université Catholique de Louvain...